11.20.19 Roy’s pain update

Roy saw his orthopedic spinal surgeon, Dr. LaFleur, Monday. The MRI shows narrowing of his spinal canal and vascular claudication.

Narrowing of the spinal canal is a narrowing of the spaces within your spine, which can put pressure on the nerves that travel through your spine.

Surgery is probably needed for the spinal narrowing, either fusion of several spinal vertebrae with a 6 month recovery or a lessor spinal surgery to decompress his spine with a 3 month recovery. Roy doesn’t want to have either surgery right now sincie the Thanksgiving, Christmas seasons are coming up.

He will have an epidural steroid injection as soon as we can schedule it when seeing Dr. Rochelle on Thursday in Hammond. That should numb the pain until he can have surgery. Roy will go back to Dr. LaFleur two weeks after the shot to see if it is helping. 

Roy will start physical therapy as soon as we can get it scheduled to get his body in better shape for whichever surgery he has. There is a good PT in Amite so he’ll go there. We are waiting for his first appointment to be scheduled.

Roy has vascular claudication and has to go to the vascular surgeon Dr. Eckholt on December 12th to find out if his blood circulation in the area of the aneurysm is causing or worsening his pain in areas other than his back. The orthopedic doctor wants to know that.

Last but not at all least Roy has to stop smoking to help his body get in better shape help him with the surgery and healing after. His appointment with them is on Monday at 2. So we will spend our 47th anniversary there!!

Roy is still in pain but if the epidural shot works he’ll be able to get lots of things that have built up around here taken care of while he’s not in pain. I’ve tried to do what I can to pick up his slack. Things like finishing putting on a new door frame, miter out places for something on the door frame, or putting door handles on all of the doors in the house are above my pay grade!

We both appreciate all of the prayers so far. I’ll keep ya’ll updated as progress is mnade.

11.16.19 Chauvin Produce Company – end of season report! Bo & Peep Update!!

Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning the temperature here was in the mid-20s for several hours.  This is unusual in Louisiana for November. It will be the end of what’s left of our vegetable garden.

This is our last Chauvin Produce Company report until next year. I’d give our 2019 garden a B-. After Roy pointed out to me all our failures I probably should say a D+! We learned a lot of lessons this year and have a lot more to learn to do this gardening at a better level.

Our okra crop has been phenomenal. It gets an A+. The production has dwindled down to maybe 5 fully grown okra a week. Way down from 10-20 every day which we picked for months. These pictures show two things. One, that there was still plenty of small okra wanting just a few more days to grow.

Two that the stalks are now so scrawny and tall. What’s there is the second growth weeks after the original stalks were cut down  These started off about six inches high and then grew and grew to be between 3 to 6 feet tall. Most of the leaves have fallen off leaving the scrawny stalks. After Tuesday night’s freeze, we’ll need to pull these up and the tiny okra will not be able to grow to adult size.

Today is the day after the freezing night. This is the top of one of the frozen okra plants. They have been such strong plants it is sad to see them like this.  So the end has come to the 2019 okra crop. They will be pulled up on Thursday. I just tried pulling them up and they developed such strong stalks at the bottom that I only got three pulled up before having to stop.  I’ll go back and pull more up later.

I took this next picture because pictures I’ve taken like the one above do not show how thick and strong the stalks really are. Many of the roots were at least 3 feet long.  This has been our best crop and will definitely be planted next year.

All the tomato plants have died and were pulled up. We’ve grown tomatoes in the past several times, even while we were living in Minnesota and they have always done really well.  This year we tried to grow from seeds and from small plants and the produce from these plants was pitiful.  Roy took over the tomatoes at one point and even with him trying various things it just did no good.  They were the skinniest, scrawniest tomato plants. So sad. They get a D-

Bo and Peep, our ducks, finally found the garden and waddled around it a bit!

Each bell pepper bush had several flowers on them getting ready to birth young bell peppers! The bell peppers get an A-.

Overnight all of the bell pepper bush leaves froze and are all limp leaves now. They will all get pulled up tomorrow.

The artichoke plant struggled to grow since planting it in the garden. No artichoke has even tried to form but it is showing no signs of being affected by the freeze.  It will be left alone and we’ll see what it does all alone in the garden! It’s the only plant still in the garden and can stay there until Roy tills the garden soil early next year.

All of the leaves on our fig trees have fallen off like they are suppose to.  What isn’t supposed to happen is for a new fig to develop yet here it is! They got a C+ for the season.

The daisies aren’t in our vegetable gardens but the beautiful plant that Ellen Smith gave us at Easter is blooming away again!  The freeze didn’t affect them which I found odd but I’m glad it didn’t.

Report on this year’s crops:

Next year we will not grow corn, cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, onions, broccoli, watermelon, cantaloupe.

The watermelon and cantaloupe crop failures were my saddest losses. They produced lots of vines and several small watermelons and one especially nice cantaloupe which was eaten by something overnight. Only one watermelon grew to a decent size and it was delicious. All the rest (about 12) of the watermelons never grew any larger than a baseball and then stopped and died! We even tried growing them in two different places but that didn’t help

The corn was cool to grow and looked neat but out of two crops of 10+ stalks each, we only got 6 nice corns from the first crop. They were delicious but not enough to make it worth the work involved. The second crop of 10 produced nothing edible. A lesson to pass along is that corn grows just as well when planting a seed into the ground as it does when growing it from seed inside and transplanting into the garden.

The cauliflower, Brussel sprouts, and broccoli got a disease and had to be pulled up. The disease spread to no other plants, thank goodness.  I tried in September to grow those from seeds and after growing the seeds inside for three weeks the pretty little plants were eaten by the mystery critters.

Eggplant plants did really well at first producing several nice size eggplants.  After that first crop, what we got was small eggplants. They started falling off the bushes and if I didn’t find them right away the eggplants started rotting.  I began pulling them when they were small and preparing them to freeze when I had a bunch of them. Since the first crop did really well I’ve learned that I should pull them up after the first crop is over.

The cucumbers did really well for the first few months. I planted more seeds and those grew fat short cucumbers which were weird and turned yellow quickly so I pulled them up.

The militons were a total bust and that was very disappointing. This was a vegetable we both enjoyed seeing Roy’s mom grow when we were young. We tried really hard and for a while they seemed to be flourishing. They all the leaves and vines started to wither up and died. Lots of flowers developed on the vine before the withering started, but no militons showed up.

I may try potatoes and sweet potatoes again, we’ll see about those. They produced fairly well but the lesson I learned is that if I dug their holes deeper they would have more room to grow further underground.

I’d like to figure out why I had no luck with growing yellow onions, green onions, and garlic.  I’ll probably try again with those.  What I don’t like is that since onions and garlic grow under the soil and you can’t see if it is growing you don’t know until waiting several months that not much was growing.

Another growing below ground crop was our carrots. After around 6 months of growth, they were about the size of my pinky finger.  I’ve grown carrots in the past and they did fine.  Some research about growing carrots is needed!

All of the peanut plants above the ground were chewed off up by the mystery bunnies or other critters that come here at night and eat things. I may grow them in the main garden this year since we are planning to put a fence around the garden to keep critters out!

Our blueberry plants were not affected by the freeze and look really nice. I’m hoping next year they will be old enough to produce more than just 3 berries!

Our new pecan and plum trees were just planted a month ago and look great after the freeze.  I checked with Bracy’s before the freeze and they assured us we didn’t need to do anything to protect them.  Roy put pipe insulation around it for the night of the freeze, just in case.

I’ll end this with a Bo and Peep update on their adventures..

Our sweet duckies are enjoying pecking around where the bell peppers were pulled up!

They are loving it here and have developed some cute habits. They love watermelon and peck away till they get to the rind.  They also love lettuce and grapes and will gobble up a small head of lettuce whether chopped up or not.

Roy put fresh baled hay in their cage before the freeze because Roy learned that is warmer for them than the pine straw that was in there.  Their nice thick cage cover helped to keep them okay that night and every night. They now go into their cage every evening without any fighting!

Another thing they do now is to sit at the top of the hill where they can see everything from there like we do from our kitchen window. They follow us everywhere we go outside. When they hear the back door opening they run to see what we are doing. I probably should say they come waddling to us! They are so cute and sweet and again we are thankful to Bonnie and Tony for giving them to us. When they swack, quack and waddle around the yard Roy and I sometimes squack, quack and waddle with them. They probably think we’re crazy humans but well, we are!

I painted them a Bo & Peep Chauvin rock and individual Bo Duck Chauvin and a different one for Peep Duck Chauvin to lay on their cage cover during the day when the cover sides are laid on top of the cage.

Well, that wraps up this year’s garden updates and a Bo and Peep update!  After just now pulling up our okras, some of which had 3 foot long strong roots, I am ready for at least a couple of months of no gardening before we start again next year!I’ll be using this time to learn how not to do whatever we did wrong and maybe how to make our positive vegetable growing even better!

Ya’ll have a Blessed weekend!

11.11.19 Veterans Day 2019 – To each and every one of you who serve, WE THANK YOU!

WHAT IS VETERANS DAY?

Veterans Day, observed annually on November 11, is a tribute to military veterans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Not to be confused with Memorial Day, which honors those who died while in service, Veterans Day honors all military veterans, including those still with us

WHY VETERANS DAY IS IMPORTANT?

  1. It’s a chance to thank people for risking their lives to defend America

    An estimated 20 percent of Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder or major depression, according to government statistics, and you’d be surprised at how valuable it can be to veterans to feel valued by civilians for their service and sacrifice.

  2. It’s a chance to reflect on the importance of peace

    While our military are often thought of in a war context, most veterans will tell you that they risked their lives to defend our fundamental freedoms, and that they value peace much more highly than war. Very few who have seen the real horror of war are anxious to rush into it, and Veterans Day encourages all of us to reflect on the value of harmony in our daily interactions and lives.

  3. It draws attention to the challenges facing many veterans

    Veterans face disproportionate rates of homelessness, deficits in educational achievement, a struggle to find employment and often, have to deal with devastating wounds. In many cases, post-traumatic stress disorder makes it hard for them to integrate into regular society. By understanding these challenges, we can all reach across those divides and make sure veterans have the best possible chance of having a healthy and fulfilling life after their service.

    STATS ABOUT VETERANS DAY

    19.6 million U.S. veterans

    There are currently nearly 20 million living U.S. veterans of wars such as World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.

    1.9 million female veterans

    Women have served in combat arenas for only the last few decades.

    500K Living World War II Veterans

    There are fewer than half a million World War II veterans still living in the U.S. as of 2018.

    EXCERPTS FROM VETERANS DAY 2019 AT NATIONALTODAY.COM

    Thank you to all of our Veterans especially my husband Roy (Navy), our son Chad (Army) and my dad Leroy Blum (Army) for your willingness to serve our country and protect our freedom!

    This purple color is in honor of LSU’s win over their rivals Alabama in the game on Saturday 46-41!

     

     

11.09.19 ‘Be Kind! Just Try It! I Will!’ 98-Year-Old Leads Glenwood Minn. Kindness Movement

It started as a way to counteract things going wrong: A small-town movement to be kind to everyone. Now, it’s the goal of young and old in the city of Glenwood, near Alexandria. The movement is led by 98-year-old Margaret Pederson.
a group of people standing next to a person“You can’t read very much in the paper until you know that there’s a wrong thing going on in the country,” Pederson said.At Minnewaska High School, it’s a senior that’s leading the way.“I had that in my bones when I came here,” Pederson said of kindness.

Not many 98-year-olds start a movement but when it comes to the younger generations, Pederson is front and center.

“We probably haven’t done a very good job as seniors to give them what they should have gotten from us,” Pederson said. “So start right now. Don’t wait a minute longer.”

They aren’t. And who would have thought that finger-knitting would bring people together?

“It takes a pretty special person to bring 60 football players together, teach them how to finger knit and keep them all as a group and engaged all night long,” said school counselor Britt Rose.

People as young as 3 years old up to 98 have helped knit Margaret’s “Be Kind” chain.

“We made a long chain. We have about a mile long,” she said.

The ‘Be Kinders’ joined forces with Rachel’s Challenge, named after Rachel Scott who was killed in the Columbine Shooting. She too believed in simple acts of kindness.

“This idea of a chain reaction, that of if one person was kind everybody would follow,” student Annika Stensrud said.

It’s easy to say that Pederson’s chain created a chain reaction at the school. It led to kindness notes in the hallways and reports of students reaching out and helping each other. And through it all, Pederson became a cheerleader.

Her “Be Kind! Just Try It! I Will!” chant became as accepted as a good deed. So now, whenever she visits the school, students and adults alike let her know that she, too, is special.

“I shouldn’t say that no one else could have done this, but she is an inspiration,” said retired police chief Ivan Fossen.

“To work with all of our kids, from our kindergartners all the way up to our football team, and to make an impact with all of them is a pretty incredible deal,” elementary school Principal Sarah Suchy said.

Pederson credits people throughout the county for helping with the movement.

“As long as you remember that you have to keep going,” she said.

A Glenwood business even made the “Be Kind” shirts which can now be found in 35 states and 13 countries.

So if this small town can create a kindness movement, maybe your town can do it too! I tried to find an image showing the Be Kind finger knit chain but couldn’t find it. This is what a finger knit looks like! Ya’ll have a Blessed Weekend!

 

11.05.19 Two weeks of Chauvin activities!

So many things to get down in writing here before I forget about them!

We don’t know what size Roy’s aneurysm is but this graphic helped me understand where and what the aneurysm looks like.

Most recently, yesterday, and most important is a visit to a new orthopedic doctor Dr. LaFleur who did back x-rays on Roy which surprisingly showed he has an aortic aneurysm. We were not expecting that and were shocked. Roy was referred to a vascular surgeon for that. Waiting for that appointment to be made. That has to be addressed before we go back to Dr. LaFleur. The aortic aneurysm can be causing the pain or not! An MRI and ultrasound are ordered so that will be done on Nov. 12 at 8 am at North Oaks in Livingston. We’d like to ask for prayers for this health situation.

We early voted yesterday in our gubernatorial election at our courthouse!

Our sweet new grandpuppy Samson got his first grooming and a new bowtie!  I’m not at all biased (haha) but I think he is the cutest puppy ever. Am I right? Over 100 pounds of preciousness in a less than 2 pound package!

Tuesday, I went to visit my dear friend Cindy LeBlanc that I worked with at Southeastern for many years. Cindy has breast cancer yes she has such a positive spirit.  Please pray for Cindy as she goes through dealing with this disease and treatment. She and I don’t usually get time just the two of us and I really enjoyed our visit.  Cindy has a “She Shed” which made my jaw drop. I could have easily moved into that She Shed and spent many happy hours creating with all the craft supplied she had. She very generously gave me some top layer of several napkins for me to try decoupaging on my rocks! Oddly enough I did not take one picture of anything that day. Her house was flooded back in 2016 and the renovation they did was outstanding.  I especially love both bathrooms and the bedrooms, well I kinda love all of it!  We’re already planning on a follow visit for some of that fun in the “She Shed.”

Wednesday, we also went to visit our four grandchildren from the son and daughter in law we cannot name. It was our oldest granddaughter’s 11th birthday and what a wonderful visit we had. This young lady has written a book, drew her own illustrations and even typed it herself.  I am very proud of her talent.  The kids put sparkly stickers all over us (even my face and Roy’s cane), sang hymns to us, ate sweet goodies, heard all about their family trip to the Auburn/LSU game and basically couldn’t get enough of their preciousness! They are going to learn the tune and words to my favorite hymn Because He Lives so they can sing it for us at Thanksgiving! I left there exhausted but so full of Grannie happiness!

Thursday, we had a visit from two dear friends John and Donna Mollere. The purpose of the visit was for Roy to check out and fix John’s computer but as always Donna and I spend the whole time visiting. She is a wonderful painter but I got brave and showed her my version of painting on my rocks! She was kind and did not laugh at my feeble attempts! They are the friends that told us about how Dr. LaFleur helped Donna so much.

Chip, Madisyn, Misty

Sunday evening we went to our church’s Fall Festival were the children enjoyed a climbing wall, inflatables, a country store, games, selfie photo booth, free hotdogs, and much more. They also had a Trunk R Treat for the kiddos!  Chip, Misty and Madisyn dressed up and joined us. I loved introducing Misty to lots of our church folks. Madisyn came dressed as Eleven from Stranger Things. If you, like me, had never heard of that character Eleven is a girl on a Netflix show called Stranger Things.

More pictures from the Fall Festival

This precious little man in so many ways reminds me of Chip when he was little. The other day he crawled under the pews at church and that clinched it for me! He’s a tiny Chip!

Three generations of Chauvin’s Rosalyn, Chip, Roy, Madisyn
Our exceptionally talented pastor’s wife, Misty, painting faces for the kids!
Young Mia painting faces. Look at the precious children waiting in line!

 

Bo and Peep, our new ducks are settling in well and we LOVE THEM!! They are making their way out into the pond a little bit more each day. I find it odd that they do not try to leave our property. I’m thankful for that though! They have discovered we live in the house so a lot of the times they set themselves by our back door. Since the weather is so nice our windows are open and I talk and sing to them through the window!

Meet Droopy and Duke!

We have a new 10′ x 10′ dog cage that currently our RV space renter’s two beagles live in.  If we ever get our own dog (which is a deep wish of mine) and when the sweet beagles don’t live here, we’ll use it for our dog.  Roy has a desire to have chickens and the cage could be used for that.

On Saturday Roy and I made many stops on the annual 15-mile yard sale along highways and side roads in our area.  We tried to stop at locations where 4 to 5 houses had sales in the same areas. We were still worn out when we finally stopped shopping. We did make some wonderful finds.  A brand new office chair for Roy. I got his old chair for my rock room so we both did well on that purchase. A four-shelf baker’s rack with three glass shelves. I’m planning to put flowers in pots on it somewhere in the back of our property. I got a cool metal bright blue pot to put flowers in for the rack! I also got 5 lighthouse statutes to use back in the picnic area. Oh, and the jewelry I bought was really nice and only cost pennies! We sifted through lots and lots of stuff before finding what we purchased. We spent hours out there and collapsed with exhaustion when we got back home. Next year we plan to go when it first starts at 7 am.

We had two heavy rainstorms that filled our pond up to overflowing.  It was at least 5 feet low before those rainstorms. Since these pictures were taken we’ve had more rain and the turtle head in the first picture is barely out of the water!

There were no LSU or Saints games last weekend but our very own Southeastern Lions beat Stephen F. Austin at home 47 to 30!

I shared with ya’ll previously how I’ve hand pulled up specific types of weeds all around our property.  A sweet young friend Tricia Hill shared with us a specific spray her dad and she used that worked. Imagine all the time I’d have for other things if I wasn’t constantly crawling around on the ground pulling those weeds! We’re buying some of the weed killer and will hopefully get rid of those pesky weeds soon! It’s supposed to be safe for our St. Augustine grass which is a plus!

Before all of Roy’s back pain started he began a project of fixing some rot that we found at the bottom on both sides of our back door.  Here he is working on this first part of the project.

After Roy dug out the rotten area.
Roy found an epoxy mix that hardened and he painted it white. He’s so smart like that!
My view the whole day while the door was being worked on!

The remainder of the items to finish the project have been acquired and are patiently waiting for Roy to be able to finish the project.

I have been painting a lot of TRUMP 2020 rocks in preparation for helping to get him re-elected next year! This may sound terrible, but my fear about these Trump rocks is that someone will use it to throw through someone’s window and blame it on Trump. That’s crazy but unfortunately, that’s the world we live in. Please pray that doesn’t happen.

Here’s a couple of those and other rocks that were hidden yesterday in Hammond.  The big Saints one was already found and a picture posted on my Rosie Rocks Facebook group! I’d love it if you would join that group so you see when people find my rocks! 

Another work buddie Sandy is coming to our house to visit tomorrow so we’ll see what kind of trouble we can get in!

I’ll end with two pictures I just took. These are our neighbors cows.  They are rarely all together like this.

Wow, that turned out to be a really long one. Ya’ll have a really Blessed week!

 

11.04.19 A Thanksgiving Garden

A THANKSGIVING GARDEN

Plant three rows of peas

  • Peace in our hearts
  • Peace in our schools
  • Peace in our world

Plant four rows of squash

  • Squash gossip
  • Squash indifference
  • Squash grumbling
  • Squash selfishness

Plant four rows of Lettuce

  • Lettuce be faithful
  • Lettuce be kind
  • Lettuce be obedient.
  • Lettuce really love one another

No garden should be without turnips

  • Turnip for lessons
  • Turnip on time
  • Turnip to help another

Water freely with patience and cultivate with love.

To conclude our garden, we must have thyme

  • Thyme for study
  • Thyme for friends
  • Thyme for family!

I hope ya’ll have a Blessed Week!

11.03.19 A quiet thought for October 27th, by Rev. Bob Adams

Wind. Pneuma. Spirit. Breath. The Spirit, Breath of the God-head, moves on and in us as HE desires carrying us ever deeper into the riches of the grace and truth of Jesus.

What a glorious way to live: ushered through every day by the gentle nudging of the Spirit of Jesus!

Sometimes the Spirit blows us into beautiful places, calm spiritual harbors where all feel safe and well.

At other times He carries us out to sea and we find ourselves lost in the vast, unendingness of the will of God. Now and then He takes us into storms for purposes we cannot see.

What a glorious way to live!

However, on too many days I assume I have arrived and there are no more new, eternal places He wants to take me.

On those days I never set the sails of my heart to catch the Wind of the Spirit but remain anchored to yesterday’s glory.

But, oh, in those hours and days when I yield to His leading!

May the wind of His Spirit blow across your heart today.

Grace to you!

Written by Rev. Bob Adams

 

10.31.19 Ex-drug addict baptized at church he vandalized 6 months earlier

‘God is real & answers prayers’

Mike Lefler, the associate pastor of ministries at Central Baptist Church in Conway, Ark., prepares to baptize Brenton Winn during a Wednesday night service in September.

Church goers were left praising God after a former drug addict was baptized at a church he broke into and vandalized just six months earlier.

Brenton Winn, 23, caused $100,000 worth of property damage at Central Baptist Church in Conway, Arkansas, and was arrested in February.

Winn is described to have destroyed everything in sight at the church when he broke in, smashing laptops, cameras and various other pieces of expensive electrical equipment used by the church. He also vandalized an area of the church with a racial slur, and set fire to the church’s family center.

Senior pastor of the church, Don Chandler, told KTHV: “I really don’t know what would possess a person to do this — maybe anger with God, maybe we were just too near to him at a point in time when he decided to break in and do something.”

It was revealed that at the time of the break-in, Winn was homeless and high on methamphetamines.

He has since admitted he was angry at God after he relapsed in his addiction to methamphetamines despite attending a faith-based addiction recovery program.

Following his arrest, Winn was facing a list of criminal charges, however, Pastor Chandler spoke to prosecutors and requested the man be shown grace and forgiveness rather than be judged or prosecuted.

Chandler told the Baptist Press: “You can’t preach something for 50 years without practicing it, especially in front of your whole church. Had we not shown some grace to him, everything we’ve talked about and encouraged would have gone by the wayside. It was simply the right thing to do.

“This was not a hardened criminal. This was a young man who had made some mistakes. He was on drugs and alcohol when he did what he did. But he was redeemable.”

The judge took the pastor’s request into account and opted to offer Winn a choice; to either spend the next 20 years in prison, or to voluntarily attend a 12-month rehab and recovery program operated by Renewal Ranch, which is a Christian-based ministry.

Winn embraced the opportunity awarded to him, and after spending time on the course, he came to accept Jesus Christ as his savior and redeemer.

The young man has spoken of his wayward past, and even though he grew up in a Christian household, he came to struggle with drug addiction. He has said, “My life was nothing but chaos, suicide attempts, and brokenness.”

Six months after he had broken in and vandalized Central Baptist Church, Winn returned to be baptized and to dedicate his life to the Lord.

He has testified: “As I’m starting to understand how God works, I’ve realized I didn’t pick the church that night. God picked me. If it had been any other church, I think I’d be sitting in prison right now.

“I used to think it was a coincidence [that I chose to break into the church that night], but now I call it confirmation that God is real, and He answers prayers. What was weighing on my heart was that I needed a relationship with Jesus Christ.”

Ya’ll have a Blessed Week!

10.28.19 Bo and Peep…. hmmmmm… quack quack!

We are now the proud parents of two beautiful ducks, Bo and Peep!  Peep is a girl and is around six months old.  Bo is a boy and is around a year old.  They are Buff Orpingtons, a medium-size domesticated duck, with lovely fawn buff feathers, a brownish-orange bill, and a sweet personality.

A very sweet family at our church, Tony and Bonnie contacted us last week asking if we’d like to have their two ducks.  Roy and I talked and sight unseen we said yes!  We had several ducks when we lived on Hinson Road in Hammond and loved them. Not necessarily the poop they leave all over but everything else!

When Tony and Bonnie and their two precious girls brought the ducks to us we were delighted to see how beautiful they are.  Even if they hadn’t been beautiful we’d have loved them.  When we lived in Hammond we had a really ugly duck that we actually called “Ugly Duck!”

Bo and Peep were originally Faith and Peep.  Since Faith turned out to be a boy we decided to change his name to Bo.  Thus we have Bo and Peep!

Bonnie and Tony recommended leaving them caged for the first few days before introducing them to living uncaged on our property.  We decided to leave them in there a week and have been visiting with them several times each day so they can get used to us and our voices. Plus we love visiting with them! I sing to them sometimes! And Roy quacks with them!I love seeing them twist and contort their necks to clean themselves.  They lay eggs (or ours would if they were girls) and their meat is what’s eaten when someone eats duck. I have no intention of eating them and we’ll see what happens with Peep laying eggs. This photo doesn’t show both of them entirely, it does show close up their beautiful feathers.  We’ve been giving them fresh water each time we go visit and they seem to love it! Roy fed them some tiny pieces of watermelon.  He said Peep really liked it and at all of it. It was just 5 small pieces. At Bonnie’s recommendation, we’ve both Googled what to feed ducks and have learned a lot. 

They only lived where they are in this picture on the first day. Since they need a cage of some sort we purchased one of our renters used dog cages. We moved the cage to behind our storage shed so they could stay in the shade and are more protected from nighttime attackers.

We learned that their cage needs to be covered at night in a way that will give them a place to keep away from those nighttime attackers.  Even when they get to live outside the cage during the day they will be protected in their cage at night. Roy being the person who always gets the best thing he can for any situation researched covers for their night-time cage. He found and ordered this cover.

It wasn’t very expensive, but is made of very good quality waterproof material and covers all four sides and the top.  Two sides are rolled up in the pictures so the ducks can enjoy the view. It even has a window and each side zips up to make it more secure!

We gave them a week in the cage to get used to where they live and get used to Roy and I taking care of them. Here they are experiencing their first taste of freedom

They headed for the water’s edge first thing and spent a good bit of time their first day out paddling around.  They didn’t go very far in, just on the edge. The recent rains brought a lot of pine straw to our end of the pond.  They cleared out a circle and played in that circle.

After spending most of the day in that area they came up our hill and hung around our back door. 

They go back in their cage at night. It’s been all cleaned up with fresh pine straw! We both thank Tony and Bonnie for giving these precious animals to us to love!

We’ll keep ya’ll updated (or as my friend Deborah said, duckdated!) on Bo and Peeps escapades!

Ya’ll have a Blessed Week!