05.08.20 Chauvin Produce Company 2020 – April Update

Every vegetable/fruit plant has been in the ground at least one month now. Roy’s tomato plants were started inside a month before everything else so they are ahead of other plants.

Our blueberries are producing an amazing amount of berries. A couple each day are beginning to turn deep purple. I ate the ones that were ripe yesterday so there are none to be seen.

It is interesting that while they start out as pale purple (in the picture above they look green but they are pale purple) they are inside very green and red until they turn completely pretty purple and ripe.

Since it took me till several days into May to publish this blog post I’m going to include this update on the blueberries. At lease 30 blueberries were ripe this morning, 05.08.20. I enjoyed eating them in my oatmeal for breakfast!

Our bigger fig tree has figs starting to grow all over!

The smaller fig tree also has figs starting to grow on it!

DOWN BY THE POND GARDEN

All the green beans we planted down by the pond are producing green beans. The green beans I just pulled are laying on the ground in front of the bushes. I have six more inside that I pulled first. We have green beans planted in three gardens but this is the one that is producing green beans well. This is our first year growing green beans and I like it!

Two okra seeds were planted next to the green beans and they have sprouted and starting to grow!

Bo always wants to get out when he sees us. They have plenty of time out of their cage every day! They started eating on our tomato bush’s bottom leaves when they were out all day so they have to stay in the cage more now. Peep is nesting again on 13 more eggs so she’s in the small cage most all of the day anyway!

Tomatoes growing on a couple of Roy’s tomato bushes down there by the pond along the fence. There are many tomatoes on each bush.

The eleven bushes along the fence line are doing exceptionally well. This is a new location for growing tomatoes this year. So far so good. The azaleas originally planted along the fence line seem to be doing well with the tomatoes all around them!

THE MAIN GARDEN

The seven Creole tomato bushes in our main garden are LOADED with tomatoes.

These tomatoes are growing on one of the tomato plants in the main garden

Turnips are new this year and are doing well. Spinach seeds were planted at the other end of this row but after 6 weeks nothing has sprouted. This week I planted more turnip seeds so at least we’ll have two different timed crops of turnips!!

Okra plants are mostly doing well. Some have barely sprouted but most are around this size now.

Bell Peppers did so well last year but this year there are four that are doing well and the REST are still much smaller. I bought more seeds and have planted them at the other end.

These pictures are of the cucumbers and green beans at the end of the garden. They are doing well! Cucumbers on the right half of the row and green beans on the left!

Cucumbers have yellow flowers and some tiny cucumbers already!

Green beans are filling out and growing up!

My cherry tomato plants were started a month behind Roys but are doing really well with several buds. These are bigger size cherry tomatoes than we previously grew.

Pecan tree is growing well!

We have not started growing wine bottles. I’ll be writing more about them on a future blog post!

You can see from this picture that the middle of the garden (eggplants, okra, bell peppers) have smaller plants than last year. I’m hoping they wind up doing well. As far as I can tell I didn’t do anything different this year than last.

NEXT TO THE DOG CAGE GARDEN

The lattice arbor has a good bit of grapevine growing on it. No grapes yet but I think they produce grapes later in the summer.

In the dog cage garden potatoes, green beans, tomatoes, and watermelons (both yellow and red meat) are planted This is a new location for us to grow vegetables and I’m finding the ground there is holding a lot of water causing my feet to sink when walking through the area along the fence. But the plants are growing well.

Here is a picture of the whole garden. In the back are green beans, then in front of that potatoes, nearer the front is red and yellow meat watermelon vines. On both sides in the red cages and one on the fence line are the same cherry tomato seeds planted a couple of months ago. The ones in the main garden are a few feet tall but these in this garden were only planted in the ground last week so they are way behind the others.

Here are two of the tomato plants. See how much smaller they are than the ones in the main garden. They stayed in their little seedling cup a lot longer than their brothers and sisters!

Two groups of green beans

Potato plant. Only one is doing this well. Others are just starting to sprout. I take potatoes from the grocery that sprout and use them for my potato seeds. I planted two more sprouting potato pieces in the potato row yesterday.

Red meat watermelon vines. I forgot to take a picture of the yellow meat vines.

This is not a vegetable or fruit but… Our little cactus garden is near the dog cage garden and this cactus, which is our biggest, has three beautiful blooms on it. They don’t last long so I am glad I got these photos! I think the cacti in the blue pot next to these gorgeous blooms are getting ready to bloom their yellow blooms. I’ll grab a picture of those to share when that happens!

So that is our end of April garden update!

02.21.20 A look at what makes New Orleans’ cemeteries unique

When we went to visit Roy’s parents grave at St. Vincent dePaul Cemetery #1 this week I spent some time walking through the cemetery. I’ve always loved cemeteries with old graves in them. Of course, I took pictures throughout to share here since a lot of our followers are not from this area and have different burial places than we do. The St. Vincent de Paul Cemeteries were established in 1859 and many of the graves had death dates in the latter part of that century. This cemetery is pretty representative of most of the styles of graves/tombs in New Orleans.

One reason that our cemeteries are different is that burial plots are shallow in New Orleans because the water table is very high. Dig a few feet down, and the grave becomes soggy, filling with water. The casket will literally float.

I did some reading up on these old New Orleans cemeteries and found that the cemeteries of New Orleans are often called “cities of the dead.” Not only do the tombs look like buildings, but the cemeteries are organized with streets (and street signs) much like the cities of the living. I know that my dad’s grave is on Pecan Street in his cemetery!

Here’s an interesting tidbit. You might wonder how we can bury more than one family member in a vault, like Roy’s parents which is in the picture below? How can a tomb hold all of those coffins? According to a local ordinance, as long as the previously deceased family member has been dead for at least two years, the remains of that person can be moved to a specially made burial bag and placed at the side or back of the vault. The coffin is then destroyed, and the vault is now ready for a newly deceased family member. What happens if a family member dies within that two-year period? Generally, local cemeteries are equipped with temporary holding vaults, and the newly deceased family member is moved into his or her final resting place when two years have elapsed.

Because of the age of this cemetery and most cemeteries in New Orleans you will see both beautifully maintained burial plots/tombs/vaults and those in disrepair. There are cemeteries in New Orleans much older than this one and those are really interesting! This portion of the cemetery is dedicated to housing the bodies of Catholic Nuns. It is very nicely maintained.

The nun’s graves looking forward from the back of that area. These are less expensive burial “wall vaults.”The same rules apply about putting a newly dead body in after the one before has been dead at least two years.

These raised rectangular graves are what most graves are like in the old New Orleans cemeteries. They are called copings.  .Oddly the section of this cemetery where the priests are buried is not nearly as pristine as the nun’s burial section.

The rest of these photos I took while roaming through the cemetery.

Everyone knows Boudreaux is a famous cajun last name. I had to take a picture of this nameplate!

I don’t know if this is unusual but we have indoor burial vaults like the ones below.

We live on the Northshore of Lake Ponchatrain. Our water levels are different here so our coffins are buried in the ground. I like our cemeteries over here but have always loved the uniqueness of the old New Orleans cemeteries!

Ya’ll have a Blessed week!

02.19.20 Our day in New Orleans

Tuesday Roy and I drove the 90-minute ride to visit his parent’s graves at St. Vincent dePaul Cemetery #1 in Uptown New Orleans, Louisiana. New Orleans is where we grew up and lived the first 10 years of our married life.

It’s been a long time since we visited their graves. We set out from home at 9 am and stopped along the way to see the house and neighborhood that Roy grew up in on White Street in Metairie (the city next to New Orleans.) The street looks pretty much the same and the houses too. Other than some updates to houses and yards it could have been back when Roy and I were dating. Although it was totally renovated when it was sold after his parent’s death, we saw today that it wasn’t in the best of shape and needs a lot of maintenance.

Roy’s best friend growing up, Mike Brauninger, lived next door at this house.Looking down White Street from in front of the church next door.   Roy and I both lived in the same home all our lives.  His on White Street in Metairie and mine on Milne Street in New Orleans. When we left White Street in Metairie we went to uptown New Orleans near Soniat and Loyola. That is where Roy’s mom and dad’s graves are at St. Vincent dePaul Cemetery #1 in Uptown New Orleans, Louisiana.

Roy’s parents are the last two names on the marble stone.

His father, Theodore Chauvin 1915 – 1987

His mother, Vivian F. Chauvin 1914 – 2003  

We didn’t know if anyone brought flowers recently so we brought some pretty silk flowers for the grave. They look like something Roy’s parents would like. They are both really missed.Our morning in New Orleans included going by the home I was raised in on Milne Street. This is the I-10 exit to our home.

This is the tiny, 700 square foot home I was raised in! The empty lot to the left of our tiny home was where the house my grandmother, Mimi, lived. After Hurricane Katrina her house was torn down and our house was gutted and remodeled after being under water for two weeks.

My best friend growing up, Brenda Ellis lived in this house a block away.

Roy and I both noticed that the streets were still in deplorable condition, just like they have always been.

We ended the day shopping and enjoying some time at our favorite place, Sam’s Wholesale Club.

I took several photos while walking around the cemetery today and will share them in a separate post. New Orleans cemeteries are interesting, to say the least, so I hope you’ll check it out next!

Ya’ll have a Blessed week!

 

02.16.20 Chauvin Produce Company – The Seeds are Planted!

Saturday was a beautiful sunny 60-degree day at our home in Amite, Louisiana!  It was spent outside planting this year’s vegetable garden seeds in small pots.

Roy planted his creole tomato seeds a few weeks ago and they are doing very well. He planted those seeds differently than we did last year.

In past seasons I planted several seeds per pot and transplanted the healthiest plant into the garden. This year Roy planted only one seed per pot. All but two of his 18 potted seeds started growing well. He planted a fresh seed in each of those two pots and they are both doing well now.

This year he packed each pot also soaked each pot in water after packing down the potting soil. He then poked a hole about half an inch down and placed one seed in the pot covering it with dirt.

Since this seemed to work so well for his 18 tomato plants I did the same today for my 100+ plant seeds. From last year’s crop, I dried seeds for bell peppers, okra, eggplant, and cucumbers.    I might plant some of the watermelon seeds later on.

I purchased seeds for cherry tomatoes, carrots, spinach, and green beans. I did not grow spinach and green beans last year. I’ve never grown either of them so this is really new for me.  The carrots were grown last year in the garden near the pond. That location is not going to be a garden this year as it is the home of our precious Bo and Peep Ducks. The carrots are going to grow in the main garden this year.

I wrote the name of each plant on a popsicle stick.  I’m working on new rocks to identify the plant for each row in the garden. It takes the plant a few weeks of growth before I can tell them apart so the rocks serve a very important purpose.

We have four large white potatoes sprouting inside. Roy’s brother Paul brought us two mirliton plants that have nice vines already growing on them.

So the vegetable garden season has begun. At least inside it has.  The shelves and plant grow lights we purchased last year will be their home for a while now. Roy will till the soil before they begin their hardening process so they can survive outside.

So they are all lined up on the shelves and the germination process has begun!

Ya’ll have a Blessed week!

 

 

01.19.20 Chauvin Produce Company 2020

Chauvin Produce Company’s start to its 2020 season is small but it has started!

Roy can be seen below filling up his little seed cups with dirt and planting one Creole Tomato seed in each pot. His young assistants, Bo and Peep stand ready to assist if needed!

The seeds have sprouted proudly under their grow light in the rock room.

This is the artichoke plant that started as a seed last year. It grew some last year and survived the short freezes we’ve had here in Louisiana. I left it in the ground and it’s continued to grow, oh so slightly but it is growing!

You can see that there is nothing else is in the garden. When Roy’s tomato plants get big enough to plant in the ground the garden will get tilled. We’ll see what happens to the artichoke plant then!

In early February I will be planting cucumber, eggplant, bell pepper and okra seeds I saved from last year’s crop. I think that is very cool! Potatoes will definitely be grown but not sure what else I’ll plant but these are for sure crops!

Well, that was short, but I think it was kinda sweet!

Ya’ll have a Blessed Sunday!

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