07.28.20 Who remembers using or doing this…..?

I will be 66 soon and Roy will be 70 in January. Our growing up lives were very different than the lives of those growing up now. We have memories of odd things in our past. Odd to those growing up now but very natural to us. I saw these photos recently and they brought back lots of memories.

There are 50 photos. I was familiar with 48 of them. I’ll let you know which two I don’t remember or didn’t experience.

Count the ones you used or were familiar with growing up.  Let me know in the comments how you did!

These are the two I don’t remember. The nurse’s station in the photo near the end. I also never rode on a banana seat on a bicycle.

How many did you know? Let me know!!

Ya’ll have a Blessed Week!

07.25.20 The new addition to our home and Roy’s new techy toys!

This blog post has been in the making for quite a while. I am so thankful that the project and this blog post is completed!  I believe that adding a patio with a patio cover was one of the best things we’ve done. Yes, we (meaning Roy, not me) built a 27 x 16 patio cover over the cement slab we had poured in March.

Both Roy and I contributed to the writing of this post. I am sure that there are more details in this blog post than you need to know about, but all those details will help us remember something about the patio cover at some point in the future!

We saved a lot of money doing the installation ourselves (again Roy, not me). We purchased the materials at Short’s Siding and Patio Supply, LLC.  Darren at Short’s helped Roy figure out what material and supplies Roy would need to do the job. I don’t think I will ever let Roy undertake something like this no matter how much money it would save us.

Short’s delivered all the materials to our home in Amite.

I can definitely say that this was one of the most strenuous and difficult things Roy has ever tackled.  I’ve always been Roy’s little helper if that is needed. I tried to help Roy on this one and just couldn’t do it. My balance and lack of strength are stopping me from doing as much as I would have.

Our son Chip came to help a few times and was a tremendous help. Thank you Chipper for giving us your time to get this done!

We even asked our UPS driver to help put up one of the long panels. I’ll bet that was a first for him! Our neighbor Daniel came over to help put up another of the long panels. The insulated panels aren’t that heavy but their size and having to put them up above our heads made it really difficult. Roy learned on this project that taking it slow, drinking Powerade, and taking breaks often was a wise way to appreciate this project.

The columns in the back are 4″ fluted columns just like the ones on our front porch, they are just smaller!

He used 4 columns to support the 2″ x 7″ x 27′ one-piece beam to give the cover more support against strong winds. The columns are bolted to the slab with long heavy duty 1/2″ anchor bolts. Darrel from Shorts let Roy use his power hammer drill to drill the anchor holes in the slab.  When Roy got the first panel installed he set up a portable fan so that he could begin to enjoy a bit of shade and cool breeze.  He worked himself so hard I was always happy to see him in the rocker getting a bit of rest.

 These are the insulated panels that are now all locked together creating the patio cover!             Two of the panels have special beams placed inside them as to Roy’s specifications to allow the fans and outlets to be installed. Roy ran the wires through the panels and into the attic for the fans and outlets as the panels were being installed. He used metal armor cable to prevent the wires from chafing.

    The two 72″ fans each have 8 blades.  We really love them!

Us elderly Chauvins have ventured into the world of Alexa. Chip has them and we decided they were a good thing for us to as well!

We put two under the patio, two in our living room and one in our bedroom. The two under the patio and the two in the living room are set up to play in stereo and works really well. You can tell Alexa to play in the area you are in or to play everywhere. This feature is nice as you can go from room to room and not miss a beat.

The two fans are remotely controlled. By adding what is called a Bond Bridge, we can also control the fans and lights through Alexa eliminating the need for the remotes. While running the wires, Roy also installed a coax cable. He is planning on installing a 50″ outdoor TV to one of the columns in the near future. He glued a piece of treated 2 x 4 inside the column where the TV is to be mounted for extra support.

 This is Roy’s foot hanging over the edge while he was working on top of the patio cover sealing the seams.

  He still has more sealing to do but that will wait for a cooler time! He says it’s well sealed for now.

Here I am doing what little I could do. I helped Roy by holding the end cap in place while he made it permanent!

The finished patio!! We will be using our RV rockers and reclining lawn chairs, and other chairs we have on the patio for now.  The rockers suit us well and the reclining lawn chairs are perfect for an afternoon of reading under the fan’s cool breeze and shade from the sun listening to Alexa’s spa channel! We are using the big outdoor mat we used with Dora when we were traveling. When we find something more colorful in the right size we will replace the Dora mat with the new one.

This is the beautiful view of the pond from our new patio! Isn’t God’s creation amazing! The garden that is in the picture is mostly gone now and we can see much more of the pond now! I should be planting grass runners next week where the garden is now.

All my decoupaged plant pots with flowers from our property and a couple I purchased. We put them all on the bakers rack we bought at last year’s 15 Mile yard sale in our area.

We are enjoying sitting outside on this new patio and listening to a variety of music in stereo.  Even when it’s been in the 90s we have enjoyed the cool breeze that the fans provide.  You can see in some of the pictures that our garden is slowly being disassembled. We will be planting St. August runners where the main garden is very soon!

It’s always something! And this something has made us both very happy. If you come to visit us and we don’t answer the doorbell feel free to wander around to the back of the house.  You may catch us napping or just enjoying the view from our rockers!

If you are interested in having a patio cover like this one here is their contact information:

Short’s Siding and Patio Supply, LLC.

20456 S  I-12 Service Rd, Ponchatoula, LA 70454

(985) 345-1772

07.20.20 HERE’S WHAT NO CASH ACTUALLY MEANS, by Dave Ramsey

Are you a bit concerned with the shift away from cash or does it seem like no big deal? This information from Dave Ramsey was very eye-opening for me. I hope you will read his article with an open mind. It’s a two-minute read and he does a nice job of explaining this.

A cashless society means no cash. Zero. It doesn’t mean mostly cashless and you can still use a ‘wee bit of cash here & there’. Cashless means fully digital, fully traceable, fully controlled. I think those who support a cashless society aren’t fully aware of what they are asking for. A cashless society means:

  • If you are struggling with your mortgage on a particular month, you can’t do an odd job to get you through.

  • Your child can’t go & help the local farmer to earn a bit of summer cash.

  • No more cash slipped into the hands of a child as a good luck charm or from their grandparent when going on holidays.

  • No more money in birthday cards.

  • No more piggy banks for your child to collect pocket money & to learn about the value of earning.

  • No more cash for a rainy day fund or for that something special you have been putting $20 a week away for.

  • No more little jobs on the side because your wages barely cover the bills or put food on the table.

  • No more charity collections.

  • No more selling bits & pieces from your home that you no longer want/need for a bit of cash in return.

  • No more cash gifts from relatives or loved ones.

What a cashless society does guarantee:

  • Banks have full control of every single penny you own.

  • Every transaction you make is recorded.

  • All your movements & actions are traceable.

  • Access to your money can be blocked at the click of a button when/if banks need ‘clarification’ from you which will take about 3 weeks, a thousand questions answered & five thousand passwords.

  • You will have no choice but to declare & be taxed on every dollar in your possession.

  • The government WILL decide what you can & cannot purchase.

  • If your transactions are deemed in any way questionable, by those who create the questions, your money will be frozen, ‘for your own good’.

Forget about cash being dirty. Stop being so easily led. Cash has been around for a very, very, very long time & it gives you control over how you trade with the world. It gives you independence. I heard a story where a man supposedly contracted Covid because of a $20 bill he had handled. There is the same chance of Covid being on a card as being on cash. If you cannot see how utterly ridiculous this assumption is then there is little hope.

If you are a customer, pay with cash. If you are a shop owner, remove those ridiculous signs that ask people to pay by card. Cash is a legal tender, it is our right to pay with cash. Banks are making it increasingly difficult to lodge cash & that has nothing to do with a virus, nor has this ‘dirty money’ trend.

Pay with cash & please say no to a cashless society while you still have the choice.

This is one of my favorite scriptures. Ya’ll have a Blessed week!

07.05.20 Chauvin Produce Company 2020 June Update

I looked back at last year’s Chauvin Produce Company blog post for the end of June and wow what a difference. Hardly anything that we are growing this year is nearly as big or healthy-looking like last year’s was.  We are using seeds from a different company so since we are doing everything the same as last year I think it’s that.

We will most likely not going to be growing much, if anything next year. I am 65 and Roy is 69 which isn’t terribly old but our bodies just aint what they use to be!  I just spent several hours one day this week pulling and digging up weeds out of the garden and pulling dead leaves off of plants.  Our tomato bushes have black shriveled leaves that look like the plant was grown in the Addams Family garden (graveyard). It’s rather creepy!

Here’s some pictures that kinda look like all is well but it aint! Last year each row in the main garden were filled with plants one after another.  There are big gaps this year in the rows of bell peppers, okra, eggplant. The turnips produced nicely a few weeks ago in the first half of a row. I then planted the same seeds in the second half of the row and not one seed produced.

Bell Pepper Plants have produced very small bell peppers. Not nearly big enough to stuff so I’ve just gutted and sliced them and put them in the freezer.

 

Roy’s Creole Tomatoes  – like I said previously some of these bushes are not big tomatoes they are cherry tomatoes. At least half have been rotten once they ripened. We’ve picked them a few days early and allowed them to ripen inside. When they started growing strong and ripening quickly I put up 4 gallon freezer bags of tomatoes to use in spaghetti, chili, etc.

 

The Main Garden  from left to right – Cherry Tomatoes, Eggplants/Sweet Potatoes, Okra, Bell Pepper, Empty Row where Turnips grew and Spinach tried to grow, last row on the right is Creole Tomatoes.  In the back on the left are green beans and on the right are cucumbers.

 

Okra – This years Okra plants are not as tall as last year but the okras are much bigger.

 

Black Beauty Eggplant Bushes – Much shorter than last year but there are several eggplants on the bushes. Hoping more will be ready soon.

 

In the middle of the eggplant bushes, there is one sweet potato vine that came up on it’s own!

 

Bush Green Beans

 

Cucumbers, what’s left of them! I pulled up long dead vines and I planted several more seeds this week.

 

These are my delicious cherry tomatoes. This bush got so heavy when the wind blew hard it knocked it over. I pulled up one bush that was just pitiful.

Roy and I have decided that because of how poorly they have all done this year that when the weeds get bad again like they were this week that the main garden will be dug under so the grass can start growing there.

The garden down by the pond has a row of pitiful (mostly nibbled on by some animals) green beans and a few really nice creole tomato bushes next to some okay tomatoes!

The puny bush green beans that the critters eat on! I leave them there just so it keeps the critters from looking for other food sources!

 

These creole tomatoes are doing the best. They are growing up along the fence on our property boundary. The first few are doing great. The ones to the right of that are okay.

 

The two fig trees are full of figs and have grown well this past year.

The smaller fig tree

 

The bigger fig tree

 

Our plum tree, probably no fruit this year

The garden area known as the dog cage garden is growing right along! Since it’s not the tidy orderly garden like the main garden it is kind hard to tell what’s what so I labeled the photo so you can tell what’s where. It’s a big area where the plants can take off and grow.

 

Two rows of carrots in the front

 

Behind the carrots are the red meat watermelons on the left and the yellow meat watermelons. No decent size watermelons yet.

 

Turnip seeds were planted here behind the watermelons and between the two side cherry tomato bushes.

 

Potato bushes. We learned from last year’s crop that as the bush deteriorates above the ground the potatoes are growing below the ground so a ugly potato bush is a good sign!

 

Cherry tomato bush which was growing as much outside the cage as inside the cage. I cut all three tomatoes back after taking these photos. They all have tomatoes but none have ripened yet.

 

Cherry tomato bush on the left side of the garden

 

The cherry tomato bush at the back of the garden. It was growing up and down!

Our pecan tree continues to grow but doesn’t have any pecans yet.  The blueberry bushes produced several hundred berries and are finished for the year. They were delicious and are safe in our freezer!

I would like to grow our vegetables in one place next year. One creole tomato bush, one cherry tomato bush, a few green bean bushes, and some turnip plants. We loved the flavor of the turnip plants and the green beans were so good compared to store-bought turnips and green beans.  No more growing things in three places, two down the hill and one at the top of the hill.  Too much climbing in that and too much body pain pulling weeds and maintaining the plants! Next year we will find a good local produce farm and get the vegetables we want that way!

That’s our end of June update! Not published until July 5th but I’m glad to share it when we could.

So much is crazy in our country right now. I hope that reading about our little homegrown garden has given you a little remembrance of the America that we love. Homegrown gardens represent that to me especially this year. I hope you will join me in praying to God to unite our country and stop all the angry mobs trying to trample our freedom and pull down our statutes.  Our God is mighty and strong! Thankfully He chooses to love us and we must ask him to get us through this and come out on the other side even stronger.

May you have a Blessed week!

 

06.04.20 Chauvin Produce Company 2020 – May Update

I truly had forgotten how much time and effort is needed to grow vegetables. And just when some are starting to ripen, the temperatures soar to the 90s which makes being out there really difficult.

The only fruit that has required anything has been our blueberries. Since those are necessary for my brain health plus I love them, picking them is a joy. Except for the pain in my back that picking them cause. Oh well!

Starting with the main garden. Each of the vegetables growing in the main garden is labeled below and above plants. Click on that picture and any of them to enlarge it.

Roy’s tomatoes on the right in the photo above are ripening and are delicious! However, only half of the tomatoes that ripen are good, without bad spots. The other half either have a worm in them which he has sprayed for but a few got through. The other problem is the blossom rot. Roy has just added some lime to the soil to help prevent that. The tomatoes below were picked in one day. We are having to pick them early in their ripening process so they avoid the bad spots. They are delicious also!

We have enjoyed a tomato and cucumber salad with our meal every day this week and love that!

My cucumbers are producing a couple of nice ones each day which are being added to the tomato and cucumber salad. These young cucumbers are nice and tender! I love seeing new baby cucumbers like in these pictures.

.The cucumbers at bottom of the vines have an odd shape since they hit the ground in their growth and curve around upward. Those growing further up on the vine have a perfect cucumber shape.  Either shape is delicious!

Green beans are closest to the bottom of the picture and cucumbers at the other end.

Green bean bushes on the left and cucumber vines on the right.

I haven’t grown green beans before. It was quite a surprise to me how quickly they produced and how many! The beans growing in the main garden produce the most. They produce enough every day to have a meal of them. I’ve fixed them with potatoes and bacon and also with bacon wrapped around the beans. The rest have been blanched and frozen for future meals.

The turnips are another surprise for me. They grow quickly and are delicious. I had too many planted together in a few spaces which crowded the size of the bottom. We are only growing them for the bottoms which is a good thing because the green part had a lot of bug holes thought I never could find a bug on them.  I just picked another batch of turnips today to cook.

 I planted more turnip seeds in two other locations and they are slowly starting to sprout but just barely. Our first turnip side dish was served in butter salt and pepper. It was delicious. I buy turnip bottoms from the grocery sometimes and these tasted so much better! Several of my Facebook friends shared their turnip cooking recipes so I think I’m set for more turnip growth.

Okra plants are strong and growing well. I’ve picked four so far. I took these photos late last week. When I went out there this morning to pick they were already much bigger.

The bell pepper plants have flowers and some have tiny tiny bell peppers growing on them. The plants in the upper right corner of the photo above are some of the bell pepper bushes.

Eggplants are in varying sizes and the biggest two have purple flowers which precede the tiny eggplants themselves. Nothing to harvest yet but the plant looks great!

My seven cherry tomato bushes are loaded with tomatoes and are starting to ripen a few at a time! Mine were planted a month after Roys so they are maturing later.

The garden down by the pond:

The green bean plants produce a few green beans each day though they appear to have been enjoyed by some animal from time to time.

Roy’s second set of 11 creole tomato bushes are doing extremely well. He picked the first one this week and we can see hundreds more

The “dog cage garden”

Several turnip seeds were added this week in the middle of this garden. They are already sprouting! Three of my cherry tomato plants were also added to this garden.  From the time they were taken out of their pots until now (being in the ground), they have at least quadrupled their size. They are not as big or as far along as their brothers and sisters in the main garden but where they are planted is an experiment to see how that area does for tomatoes.

The potatoes have several bushes growing which is really all you see until it’s time to dig up the potatoes that are underground!

The green bean plants down there are doing about the same as the ones in the garden down by the pond. They are producing, just not as much as the main garden.

Carrot seeds were planted early this month and the green leaves that come out of the ground are doing well. There are two rows of them. In the photo below the watermelons are at the top and the two rows of carrots are at the bottom.

The red meat watermelon vines are growing really well and have flowers on them which will eventually become watermelons. The yellow meat watermelon vines are not doing as well but they are growing and look healthy. Watermelons are something we didn’t do outstanding with last year so this new place to grow them is so far promising. In the photo below the watermelon, vines are on the right and the carrots are on the left.

Fruit trees

Pecan tree is growing well but no pecans yet, too young.

The two fig trees are loaded with green figs which will probably give us around a hundred figs.

The plum tree is pretty but not bearing fruit yet, too young.

Like I said at first, the blueberries are just going to town and I am enjoying them every day.  A lot of them were put in the freezer and I get to put them in my oatmeal or yogurt every day fresh from the garden! We are over half way into them all ripening. A few more days and they will all be gone.

It has been fascinating to see a bunch of little green one a branch one day and the next one of them has exploded into this beautiful deep blue plump ripe blueberry.   The in-between stages going from small green to ripe plumb blue is a bluish pink stage.The bluish pink stage will be the ripe ones the next day. Of the eight bushes, one does not have any berries on it and I am going to figure out why before next year’s crop!

I love enjoying fresh blueberries right off the vine in my breakfast yogurt or oatmeal!

https://rosalynandroy.files.wordpress.com/2020/05/20200525_105015.jpg Roy’s grape vines are growing. No grapes on those vines yet!

I think that’s about it for the month of May. Some observations want to note.

Each row is not full of that row’s vegetable.

The turnip seeds I planted at this end of that row came up very well and quickly. The ones I planted at the other end of the row aren’t hardly doing anything. Not sure why!

Even though this years rows are further apart than last yer it is still difficult to get down the aisles as the plants get bigger.

Most important is that we purchased most all of our seeds from the Seed Plant online company. Thiswas a change from previous years.

 

05.08.20 Chauvin Produce Company 2020 – April Update

Every vegetable/fruit plant has been in the ground at least one month now. Roy’s tomato plants were started inside a month before everything else so they are ahead of other plants.

Our blueberries are producing an amazing amount of berries. A couple each day are beginning to turn deep purple. I ate the ones that were ripe yesterday so there are none to be seen.

It is interesting that while they start out as pale purple (in the picture above they look green but they are pale purple) they are inside very green and red until they turn completely pretty purple and ripe.

Since it took me till several days into May to publish this blog post I’m going to include this update on the blueberries. At lease 30 blueberries were ripe this morning, 05.08.20. I enjoyed eating them in my oatmeal for breakfast!

Our bigger fig tree has figs starting to grow all over!

The smaller fig tree also has figs starting to grow on it!

DOWN BY THE POND GARDEN

All the green beans we planted down by the pond are producing green beans. The green beans I just pulled are laying on the ground in front of the bushes. I have six more inside that I pulled first. We have green beans planted in three gardens but this is the one that is producing green beans well. This is our first year growing green beans and I like it!

Two okra seeds were planted next to the green beans and they have sprouted and starting to grow!

Bo always wants to get out when he sees us. They have plenty of time out of their cage every day! They started eating on our tomato bush’s bottom leaves when they were out all day so they have to stay in the cage more now. Peep is nesting again on 13 more eggs so she’s in the small cage most all of the day anyway!

Tomatoes growing on a couple of Roy’s tomato bushes down there by the pond along the fence. There are many tomatoes on each bush.

The eleven bushes along the fence line are doing exceptionally well. This is a new location for growing tomatoes this year. So far so good. The azaleas originally planted along the fence line seem to be doing well with the tomatoes all around them!

THE MAIN GARDEN

The seven Creole tomato bushes in our main garden are LOADED with tomatoes.

These tomatoes are growing on one of the tomato plants in the main garden

Turnips are new this year and are doing well. Spinach seeds were planted at the other end of this row but after 6 weeks nothing has sprouted. This week I planted more turnip seeds so at least we’ll have two different timed crops of turnips!!

Okra plants are mostly doing well. Some have barely sprouted but most are around this size now.

Bell Peppers did so well last year but this year there are four that are doing well and the REST are still much smaller. I bought more seeds and have planted them at the other end.

These pictures are of the cucumbers and green beans at the end of the garden. They are doing well! Cucumbers on the right half of the row and green beans on the left!

Cucumbers have yellow flowers and some tiny cucumbers already!

Green beans are filling out and growing up!

My cherry tomato plants were started a month behind Roys but are doing really well with several buds. These are bigger size cherry tomatoes than we previously grew.

Pecan tree is growing well!

We have not started growing wine bottles. I’ll be writing more about them on a future blog post!

You can see from this picture that the middle of the garden (eggplants, okra, bell peppers) have smaller plants than last year. I’m hoping they wind up doing well. As far as I can tell I didn’t do anything different this year than last.

NEXT TO THE DOG CAGE GARDEN

The lattice arbor has a good bit of grapevine growing on it. No grapes yet but I think they produce grapes later in the summer.

In the dog cage garden potatoes, green beans, tomatoes, and watermelons (both yellow and red meat) are planted This is a new location for us to grow vegetables and I’m finding the ground there is holding a lot of water causing my feet to sink when walking through the area along the fence. But the plants are growing well.

Here is a picture of the whole garden. In the back are green beans, then in front of that potatoes, nearer the front is red and yellow meat watermelon vines. On both sides in the red cages and one on the fence line are the same cherry tomato seeds planted a couple of months ago. The ones in the main garden are a few feet tall but these in this garden were only planted in the ground last week so they are way behind the others.

Here are two of the tomato plants. See how much smaller they are than the ones in the main garden. They stayed in their little seedling cup a lot longer than their brothers and sisters!

Two groups of green beans

Potato plant. Only one is doing this well. Others are just starting to sprout. I take potatoes from the grocery that sprout and use them for my potato seeds. I planted two more sprouting potato pieces in the potato row yesterday.

Red meat watermelon vines. I forgot to take a picture of the yellow meat vines.

This is not a vegetable or fruit but… Our little cactus garden is near the dog cage garden and this cactus, which is our biggest, has three beautiful blooms on it. They don’t last long so I am glad I got these photos! I think the cacti in the blue pot next to these gorgeous blooms are getting ready to bloom their yellow blooms. I’ll grab a picture of those to share when that happens!

So that is our end of April garden update!

02.21.20 A look at what makes New Orleans’ cemeteries unique

When we went to visit Roy’s parents grave at St. Vincent dePaul Cemetery #1 this week I spent some time walking through the cemetery. I’ve always loved cemeteries with old graves in them. Of course, I took pictures throughout to share here since a lot of our followers are not from this area and have different burial places than we do. The St. Vincent de Paul Cemeteries were established in 1859 and many of the graves had death dates in the latter part of that century. This cemetery is pretty representative of most of the styles of graves/tombs in New Orleans.

One reason that our cemeteries are different is that burial plots are shallow in New Orleans because the water table is very high. Dig a few feet down, and the grave becomes soggy, filling with water. The casket will literally float.

I did some reading up on these old New Orleans cemeteries and found that the cemeteries of New Orleans are often called “cities of the dead.” Not only do the tombs look like buildings, but the cemeteries are organized with streets (and street signs) much like the cities of the living. I know that my dad’s grave is on Pecan Street in his cemetery!

Here’s an interesting tidbit. You might wonder how we can bury more than one family member in a vault, like Roy’s parents which is in the picture below? How can a tomb hold all of those coffins? According to a local ordinance, as long as the previously deceased family member has been dead for at least two years, the remains of that person can be moved to a specially made burial bag and placed at the side or back of the vault. The coffin is then destroyed, and the vault is now ready for a newly deceased family member. What happens if a family member dies within that two-year period? Generally, local cemeteries are equipped with temporary holding vaults, and the newly deceased family member is moved into his or her final resting place when two years have elapsed.

Because of the age of this cemetery and most cemeteries in New Orleans you will see both beautifully maintained burial plots/tombs/vaults and those in disrepair. There are cemeteries in New Orleans much older than this one and those are really interesting! This portion of the cemetery is dedicated to housing the bodies of Catholic Nuns. It is very nicely maintained.

The nun’s graves looking forward from the back of that area. These are less expensive burial “wall vaults.”The same rules apply about putting a newly dead body in after the one before has been dead at least two years.

These raised rectangular graves are what most graves are like in the old New Orleans cemeteries. They are called copings.  .Oddly the section of this cemetery where the priests are buried is not nearly as pristine as the nun’s burial section.

The rest of these photos I took while roaming through the cemetery.

Everyone knows Boudreaux is a famous cajun last name. I had to take a picture of this nameplate!

I don’t know if this is unusual but we have indoor burial vaults like the ones below.

We live on the Northshore of Lake Ponchatrain. Our water levels are different here so our coffins are buried in the ground. I like our cemeteries over here but have always loved the uniqueness of the old New Orleans cemeteries!

Ya’ll have a Blessed week!

02.19.20 Our day in New Orleans

Tuesday Roy and I drove the 90-minute ride to visit his parent’s graves at St. Vincent dePaul Cemetery #1 in Uptown New Orleans, Louisiana. New Orleans is where we grew up and lived the first 10 years of our married life.

It’s been a long time since we visited their graves. We set out from home at 9 am and stopped along the way to see the house and neighborhood that Roy grew up in on White Street in Metairie (the city next to New Orleans.) The street looks pretty much the same and the houses too. Other than some updates to houses and yards it could have been back when Roy and I were dating. Although it was totally renovated when it was sold after his parent’s death, we saw today that it wasn’t in the best of shape and needs a lot of maintenance.

Roy’s best friend growing up, Mike Brauninger, lived next door at this house.Looking down White Street from in front of the church next door.   Roy and I both lived in the same home all our lives.  His on White Street in Metairie and mine on Milne Street in New Orleans. When we left White Street in Metairie we went to uptown New Orleans near Soniat and Loyola. That is where Roy’s mom and dad’s graves are at St. Vincent dePaul Cemetery #1 in Uptown New Orleans, Louisiana.

Roy’s parents are the last two names on the marble stone.

His father, Theodore Chauvin 1915 – 1987

His mother, Vivian F. Chauvin 1914 – 2003  

We didn’t know if anyone brought flowers recently so we brought some pretty silk flowers for the grave. They look like something Roy’s parents would like. They are both really missed.Our morning in New Orleans included going by the home I was raised in on Milne Street. This is the I-10 exit to our home.

This is the tiny, 700 square foot home I was raised in! The empty lot to the left of our tiny home was where the house my grandmother, Mimi, lived. After Hurricane Katrina her house was torn down and our house was gutted and remodeled after being under water for two weeks.

My best friend growing up, Brenda Ellis lived in this house a block away.

Roy and I both noticed that the streets were still in deplorable condition, just like they have always been.

We ended the day shopping and enjoying some time at our favorite place, Sam’s Wholesale Club.

I took several photos while walking around the cemetery today and will share them in a separate post. New Orleans cemeteries are interesting, to say the least, so I hope you’ll check it out next!

Ya’ll have a Blessed week!

 

02.16.20 Chauvin Produce Company – The Seeds are Planted!

Saturday was a beautiful sunny 60-degree day at our home in Amite, Louisiana!  It was spent outside planting this year’s vegetable garden seeds in small pots.

Roy planted his creole tomato seeds a few weeks ago and they are doing very well. He planted those seeds differently than we did last year.

In past seasons I planted several seeds per pot and transplanted the healthiest plant into the garden. This year Roy planted only one seed per pot. All but two of his 18 potted seeds started growing well. He planted a fresh seed in each of those two pots and they are both doing well now.

This year he packed each pot also soaked each pot in water after packing down the potting soil. He then poked a hole about half an inch down and placed one seed in the pot covering it with dirt.

Since this seemed to work so well for his 18 tomato plants I did the same today for my 100+ plant seeds. From last year’s crop, I dried seeds for bell peppers, okra, eggplant, and cucumbers.    I might plant some of the watermelon seeds later on.

I purchased seeds for cherry tomatoes, carrots, spinach, and green beans. I did not grow spinach and green beans last year. I’ve never grown either of them so this is really new for me.  The carrots were grown last year in the garden near the pond. That location is not going to be a garden this year as it is the home of our precious Bo and Peep Ducks. The carrots are going to grow in the main garden this year.

I wrote the name of each plant on a popsicle stick.  I’m working on new rocks to identify the plant for each row in the garden. It takes the plant a few weeks of growth before I can tell them apart so the rocks serve a very important purpose.

We have four large white potatoes sprouting inside. Roy’s brother Paul brought us two mirliton plants that have nice vines already growing on them.

So the vegetable garden season has begun. At least inside it has.  The shelves and plant grow lights we purchased last year will be their home for a while now. Roy will till the soil before they begin their hardening process so they can survive outside.

So they are all lined up on the shelves and the germination process has begun!

Ya’ll have a Blessed week!