12.08.17 Granddaughter Baptism, Ponchatoula town Christmas Lighting, Misty’s birthday, EEG/EKG, Doctor appointment, Washing house exterior, time with Chip!!!

Friday, December 8, 2017 – The last several days have been very busy for us.

Monday – We got up early and went to Dr. Greiner’s office (eye doctor) for an appointment that wasn’t Monday but was Wednesday!  We made use of our sudden free time to do some Christmas shopping and rock shopping.

Tuesday – Juliette with Alliance Neurodiagnostics put 25 sensors on my head to get the EEG and EKG started.  It took two hours for her to do that and when she left I just flat out looked weird.

Wednesday – Roy had his surgery scheduling and eye measurement appointment for his cataract removal surgery with Dr. Greiner.  Surgery is scheduled for Tuesday December 12, 2017 at 6:45 am.  We got the price for the lens implants that will allow him to see near and far without any glasses.  After we passed out they scooped us up and we signed on the dotted line!

We did some Christmas light shopping and a visit to Hobby Lobby where the lines were so long I didn’t get the things I picked out.  We went to Chip and Misty’s to rest before going out with them for the evening celebrating our daughter in law Misty’s birthday at Mi Patio in Ponchatoula.  Food and fellowship were both great!

Friday –  I wrapped up a 72-hour video ambulatory EEG and EKG to see if I am having seizures. The sensors recorded any electrical activity in my brain and I was videoed 24 hours a day for all three days when I was in the living room and in our bedroom. Hoping to get the results back soon.

Our granddaughter Madisyn sang in the 3rd-grade chorus at Ponchatoula’s Christmas Lighting.  At various places along Ponchatoula’s main street groups from schools and churches have designated times to sing.  We couldn’t stop smiling listening to all the young voices sing Christmas songs.  The whole town is lit up with Christmas lights and decorations and several locations serve cookies and hot chocolate.  Madisyn’s group sang at the Methodist Church.  Madisyn is very tall and is on the back row. You can see her better in the first picture.  What you see in the second photo is half of the choir.  There was no room for me to move around and get the whole choir.

We enjoyed some of the cookies and delicious hot chocolate (provided by the Methodist Church) after they sang. This is us in the line for the goodies!

Our oldest granddaughter Kallie made her profession of faith public by being baptized at their church The Harbor in Hammond, Louisiana. Her church gave her a shirt that says “I Have Decided to Follow Jesus.”  Amen! The joy on Kallies’s face when she came up from under the water says it all!

If you are a Christian you understand that this is the most important decision Kallie will ever make.  If you are not a Christian and don’t understand what baptism is about here’s a summary of what making a profession of faith is about and what baptism is about.

While we believe in baptism, it does not save you, just like being a good person, and doing kind helpful things does not save you.  Only giving your life to Jesus as your Lord and Savior because you believe He gave his life to save you from your sins. This is what we call a Profession of Faith.

Water baptism is a symbolic picture of what our Lord has done for us. As we are completely immersed in the water, we symbolize burial with our Lord; we are baptized into His death on the cross and are no longer slaves to self or sin (Romans 6:3–7). When we are raised out of the water, we are symbolically resurrected—raised to new life in Christ to be with Him forever, born into the family of our loving God (Romans 8:16). Water baptism also illustrates the spiritual cleansing we experience when we are saved; just as water cleanses the flesh, so the Holy Spirit cleanses our hearts when we trust Christ.

Some faiths believe in sprinkling water on the individual. Our faith believes that like Jesus and others in the Bible did, the proper form of baptism is full body immersion.

Our New Orleans Saints won Sunday’s game over the Carolina Panthers putting us at the top of the division.  We play the Atlanta Falcons on Thursday.  That will be a great one!

Monday – Our sweet son Chip has been going nonstop for almost a week now. He took Monday off work to rest but when his dad said he was going to pressure wash the rental house today, Chip came to help him. Almost 4 hours of work which helped Roy a lot. Hopefully, Chip is back home now getting some rest. Thanks, Chip, we love you!

The weather started being very rainy and much colder on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday (today).  We may have snow overnight and in the morning.  That is quite unusual in Louisiana.  The temperature will drop to the low 20s the following night.  When we knew the weather was going to be this cold and wet we made a big pot of chicken, sausage, andouille gumbo, moved my rock painting inside and that’s where we’re staying until it gets nicer outside!

I’m wrapping this up on Friday and since early this morning it has been snowing quite heavily here!  I’m sure you know that the next blog post will be all about that white stuff visiting in Louisiana!

Ya’ll come back now, ya’ hear!

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Wacky Wonderful Wednesdays published randomly

Some Things I Learned About Dementia published randomly

12.04.17 My Video Ambulatory EEG and EKG

Monday, December 4, 2017 – I just had a 72 hour Video Ambulatory EEG. Since I had never heard about that before, I looked up some information to share with others that haven’t heard of it either.

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a test to detect problems in the electrical activity of the brain. Video Ambulatory EEG is considered to be the Gold Standard for EEG testing. This allows the doctor to see any kind of events that you may have while you are conducting some of your normal activities and during sleep. The ambulatory EEG device will be worn for a specific amount of time that your doctor believes will give him/her the best chance to find what they are looking for, usually 72 hours in most cases.

An EEG is used to help diagnose the presence and type of seizure disorders, to look for causes of confusion or periods of unconsciousness, and to evaluate head injures, tumors, infections, degenerative diseases and metabolic disturbances that affect the brain.The ambulatory EEG is video monitored to observe activities of daily living, including sleep, and correlates event data.

This is not my head but since I have too much hair to even see the probes I found this one to show what it looks like with all these things glued to my head!

They also include three small electrodes attached to your chest to do an Electrocardiogram (EKG) It is used to look for and record irregular heartbeats that come and go or happen during certain activities. The test is designed to find out what is causing chest pain, dizziness, confusion or fainting.

Alliance Neurodiagnostics is the company that handled my in-home ambulatory EEG and EKG. A different company monitored the video and data collected from the EEG and EKG.

Okay that’s what it’s all about, so this now is my personal account of having both an ambulatory EKG and EEG.

On Tuesday morning Juliette with Alliance Neurodiagnostics arrived at our motorhome with all her equipment. She asked lots of questions and took lots of notes. She went over with me lots of paperwork and things for me to sign.

She laid out all of the items she would need to hook me up.

We brought a chair inside from outside so she could get to my head from all directions. 21 sensors were glued to various specific locations around my head, two on my forehead and two on my chest.

My head was then wrapped with gauze, the wires all taped together

We had some errands to run and Misty’s birthday dinner to attend so I wrapped my head in a scarf.

This is the camera and computer set up in the living room.

The camera in our bedroom.

We can see when the monitoring service signs in because the computer screen comes on and we (and they) can see what they are seeing on the cameras.

I was very thankful when this contraption was removed from my head and I could bathe and wash my hair. They use some kind of putty glue to make the sensors stick to my scalp. To remove them I wrapped my head in a warm wet towel for 10 minutes to loosen the sensors.

The thing I liked the very least was being seen on camera 24 hours a day. Our bathroom was the only place we could not be seen! If some information is gathered by all of this, it will be worth it!

We go to see Dr. Morgan at 4 pm today to find out what the test results are. I’ll write about that when we get home.

Ya’ll come back now ya’ hear!