08.07.19 The Peanut Butter Story, Author Unknown

 

This is a true story. It is a story of God and His Faithfulness in ALL things.

And now – THE PEANUT BUTTER STORY

During a season of my life when I was a single mother and struggling financially, one of my daughters came and asked what might seem like a simple request. She said, “It’s been a while since we’ve had any peanut butter. Could we get some?” I told her I’d see what I could do about that and she went off to bed.

Well, I remember laying on the couch and crying like a baby because I knew there was no money to buy peanut butter with. I had a good old fashioned pity party. I cried out to God and told Him how unfair it was that my children had to do without such a simple request over circumstances that were not their fault. I told Him I felt ashamed to question Him and complain when we certainly had not gone hungry. Many friends and church family had been faithful to help us. God had shown His faithfulness time and time again.

I told Him it surely would be nice to be able to go to the store and get not only our needs but also a few “wants”, like peanut butter! I cried myself to sleep feeling like a failure as a mother. (The peanut butter was just the straw that pushed me over the edge of much financial stress)

The next morning I got up to go run the Meals on Wheels route that I worked that summer. I took one of the girls with me every day so I would have some special time with the daughter who went for that day. The same one went with me that day who had asked about the peanut butter.

We got to one of the houses and the sweet little lady who lived there asked if I could wait a minute after we had given her the meal. She went into her house and came back with a can in her hands. She then preceded to say “I went yesterday to get my commodities and they had this can of peanut butter in my box. Well, I don’t buy peanut butter because it gives me “the gas”. I love it but it sure doesn’t love me! Well, I kept thinking about this can of peanut butter in my cabinet last night and I got up and ate a spoon full. Let me tell you – that spoon full of peanut butter kept me up all night! When I got up this morning, I thought, I’ve got to get that stuff out of my house! Then I thought about you and your little girls coming by here every day. I don’t want to offend you by offering you an opened can with a spoon mark in it, but I figured kids all love peanut butter. Would you mind having this can of peanut butter?”

I’m sure she wondered why I was crying before she could even finish her question! Absolutely, we would love to have such a precious gift! In that moment it was more valuable than a can full of gold! Sure, a can of gold would have bought a house full of groceries, but not the lesson my children and I learned that day and that we have never forgotten.

God does hear our prayers, He hears our heart cries. He hears a little girl say “can we get some peanut butter” when there’s no money to buy it.

That little lady could have given us a loaf of bread or a bag of potatoes. But it would not have been the miracle that God wanted us to have. It would have been appreciated but not something that I would remember so vividly 20 years later.

My God is an awesome God and He cares about me personally. He cares about you too. Bring your needs and your concerns to Him. He will show you how big, and loving, and able He is.

I’ve just always felt bad that the poor little lady had “the gas” all night to get our miracle to us!

  • Author Unknown

 

08.04.19 My name is Rosalyn

A friend I’ve known for about 30 years asked me this morning if my name was RO-SA-LYN or RAH-ZA-LYN.   I won’t reveal his name so he doesn’t get bombarded with hate mail!

Ages ago people not knowing how to pronounce my name didn’t bother me.  You know why?  My mama would correct anyone who called me RAH-ZA-LYN.

Like she did, I’ll tell you my story.  My grandmother’s name was Rosa.  I called her Mimi but her given name was Rosa.  Mama and Daddy named me after her so Rosa is the first part of my name.  Hence, Rosa-lyn.

I still don’t usually correct people, even though mama is not around to take care of that.  I just don’t care but when someone I’ve known half my life doesn’t know how to pronounce my name I thought it might be more widespread than just him.

Practice with me:

RO-SA-LYN     not RAH-ZA-LYN

RO-SA-LYN     not RAH-ZA-LYN

RO-SA-LYN     not RAH-ZA-LYN

RO-SA-LYN    not RAH-ZA-LYN

No, you are not being punished and you do not have to write line after line of “I will not mispronounce ROSALYN’S name again”

Rosalyn Chauvin (pronounced as RO-SA-LYN SHOW-VAN) signing off for today!

Help me now!  Call me Rosa-lyn show-van

 

 

07.29.19 All because you gave a boy a baseball

If you know our family you know that our life revolved around baseball for many years.  Sometimes we still get to see our son and grandchildren play.  This story rang so true when I first read it.  My friends, family and strangers who follow our blog, if your child plays baseball I think you’ll read this with a smile and will see yourself or them in some part of the story.

THIS IS SO TRUE…

If you give a boy a baseball, he will want a bat to go with it.

You’ll buy him the best bat you can find, and then he will probably want a bucket of balls and a glove and some cleats too.

Then, he will probably spend hours begging you to go out in the yard to play with him, even though you may want to sit on the couch and watch tv. He will insist. And his insistence will win.

And when a boy gets a jersey, he will need pants and socks and a belt to go with it. And a TEAM…..

And then life as you know it will end.

There will be no more lazy weekends watching tv. You will see more sunrises than you ever thought possible. Every spare minute of your time will be spent hauling buckets and bags and stinky cleats and crazy boys all over tarnation for hours to practice for a game. THE GAME.

And your house will be a mess. And your car will be dirty. All because you gave a boy a baseball.

Your weekends will be spent freezing or burning to death on a fold up chair. And his weekends will be spent gaining confidence and friends, and learning new skills and having fun and getting dirty. So dirty in fact that you will have to learn how to do laundry in a whole new way, like maybe at a carwash using the pressure washer.

And you will be there the day he hits his first home run, first strikeout, and his first double play. And he will make you SO proud.  The other moms will congratulate you. But you feel weird saying thank you because it’s not you at bat or on the mound. It’s everything him. He did this.

And right before your eyes, your little boy will be transformed from the baby who spun around with his head on the bat, (because he loves attention), into a pitcher. Because he loves attention still.

When you give a boy a baseball , you give him more than just a ball. You give him a sport, and a talent, and hope, and dreams, and friends, a new family, a place to learn about life, room to grow as a person where he can push his limits, and bravery, and courage and LIFE, and memories. And he will have ALL of these things, simply because you gave a boy a baseball.

Because you gave a boy a baseball, you too will develop new/lifelong friendships, developed solely from the same passion for the game and love of your team. You will root together. And spew PG-13 things out of your mouths together. Because you gave a boy a baseball.

Then one day, many years from today….he will be in his room and a baseball will roll out from an old dusty batbag underneath his bed. And he will pick it up and realize instantly that when you gave that boy a baseball, you also gave him a childhood that he would never forget. And then he will hug you, and your eyes may leak – because you realize that everything YOU gave up along the way…..was worth it!

All because you gave a boy a baseball ⚾️ …….

This was found on Facebook and the author is unknown.

07.27.19 TRINITY BAPTIST CHURCH – FROM THE SKY! PART 2

We were very happy today when we pulled up at church for our Senior Luncheon to see the frame of our new Family Life Building looming large behind the youth building!

First a big thanks to Derek and Koree and anyone else that made the luncheon really wonderful.  The food, devotion and fellowship as always were wonderful.  I got to visit with several people that I don’t normally get to visit.  I heard talk of a possible Senior’s road trip to see The Ark during Spring Break next year.  My ears really perked up and I truly hope Roy and I can make that bus ride with them!

Here’s a photo update of the Trinity Family Life Building currently under construction. The yellow arrow  in the first photo below points out the new building.

First some photos I took from the ground at different angles.

 

The hole that is in the floor is where an elevator will live!  Here’s Roy’s drone in the air taking some photos!

Now the cooler pictures taken by Roy and his Drone.

If Trinity folks would like to have any of these photos, just right click and select Save Image As to save it on your computer.

Ya’ll have a Blessed Weekend!

07.23.19 IT’S ALL ABOUT YOUR ATTITUDE. NEVER GIVE UP NO MATTER HOW HARD IT GETS

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At age 5 his father died.

At age 16 he quit school.

At age 17 he had already lost four jobs.

At age 18 he got married.

Between ages 18 and 22, he was a railroad conductor and failed.

He joined the army and washed out there.

He applied for law school, he was rejected.

He became an insurance sales man and failed again.

At age 19 he became a father.

At age 20 his wife left him and took their baby daughter.

He became a cook and dishwasher in a small cafe.

He failed in an attempt to kidnap his own daughter, and eventually he convinced his wife to return home.

At age 65 he retired.

On the 1st day of retirement he received a check from the Government for $105.

He felt that the Government was saying that he couldn’t provide for himself.

He decided to commit suicide, life wasn’t worth living anymore; he had failed so much.

He sat under a tree writing his will, but instead, he wrote what he would have accomplished with his life. He realized there was much more that he hadn’t yet done. There was one thing he could do better than anyone he knew. And that was how to cook.

So he borrowed $87 against his check and bought and fried up some chicken using his recipe, and went door to door to sell them to his neighbors in Kentucky.

Remember, at age 65 he was ready to commit suicide.

But at age 88 Colonel Sanders, founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) Empire was a billionaire.

Moral of the story: It’s never too late to start all over.

MOST IMPORTANLY, IT’S ALL ABOUT YOUR ATTITUDE. NEVER GIVE UP NO MATTER HOW HARD IT GETS.

You have what it takes to be successful. Go for it and make a difference.

 

07.16.19 Grandpa’s Hands

My grandfathers both died before I was born so I didn’t know either of them.  However, my sons were blessed to have one of their grandfather, Vivian Traylor, as part of their lives when they were young men. He was such a wise, gentle, Godly man.  When reading this I could imagine him sitting with one of my sons and having this conversation.  How I wish we had more time with him but God was ready for him to go home.  We’ll see him again one day and what a beautiful day that will be!
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Grandpa’s Hands

Grandpa, some ninety plus years old, sat feebly and crooked on the patio bench. He didn’t move and just sat there with his head down, staring at his hands. When I sat down beside him, he didn’t acknowledge my presence.

The longer I sat, I wondered if he was okay. Finally, not really wanting to disturb him, but wanting to check on him at the same time, I asked, “Are you okay, Grandpa?”

He raised his head and looked at me and smiled.

“Yes, I’m fine,” he said in a clear strong voice. “Thank you for asking,”

“I didn’t mean to disturb you, Grandpa,” I explained to him, “But you were just sitting here staring at your hands, and I wanted to make sure nothing was wrong.”

“Have you ever looked at your hands?” he asked in his shaking voice, . . . “I mean really looked at your hands?”

I slowly opened my hands and stared down at them. I turned them over, palms up and then palms down. No, I guess I had never really looked at my hands, as I tried to figure out the point he was trying to make.

Grandpa smiled and related this story to me:

“Stop and think for a moment about the hands you have and how they have served you well throughout your years. My hands, though wrinkled, shriveled, and weak, have been the tools I have used all my life to reach out to grab and embrace life’s opportunities and adversities.

They braced and caught me when as a toddler when I had continued to fall upon the floor. They put food in my mouth and pulled clothes over my back. As a child, my mother had taught me to fold these hands in prayer.

They tied my first shoes when I was young and pulled on my boots when I found my first job. Then later they held my rifle while they wiped my tears away when I left your grandmother to go off to war to defend our country.

They have been dirty, scraped raw, swollen, and bent. They were uneasy and clumsy when I tried to hold my newborn son. With one finger decorated with a wedding band, they showed the world that I was married and loved someone special.

They wrote the letters home and walked your mother down the isle. And they trembled and shook when I had to buried my parents and later your grandmother. Yet, they were strong and sure when I dug my buddy out of a foxhole and lifted a plow off of my best friend’s leg.

They have held children, consoled neighbors, and shook their fingers in a fist when some people called me an extremist for flying the American flag on my home. They have covered my face, combed my hair, and washed and cleansed the rest of my body. They have been sticky and wet, bent and broken, and dried and raw.

And to this day when not much of anything else of me really works well, these hands hold me up, lay me down, and again continue to fold in prayer. These hands are the mark of where I’ve been and the ruggedness of the life I’ve had to live.

But more importantly, it will be these hands that God will reach out to and take when He soon leads me home. And with these hands, He will lift me to His side, and there I will use these hands to touch the face of His son.”

Since hearing his words, I have never looked at my hands the same way again. But I remember when God later reached out and took my grandpa’s hands and led him home.

Now when my hands are hurt or sore, or when I stroke the face of my children and wife, I think of grandpa’s words of gentle, loving wisdom to take nothing for granted . . . even these hands.

Author Unknown

07.14.19 Chauvin Produce Company – Things they are a changing

Things, they are a changing in the garden!

This week I harvested our entire crop of potatoes.  See the picture below. It was not the large basket full of potatoes I hoped for.  But it will provide us with maybe 4 meals of potatoes so that’s good. Once the plants above the ground died off you’re supposed to wait two to three weeks and then dig them up.  I did that and didn’t get the big crop of larger potatoes I wanted.  There is no peaking under the soil to see what’s going on so they all got dug up and that’s that! If anyone reading this knows I did something drastically wrong, please let me know!

I cooked all of the really small ones and made homemade mashed potatoes for dinner.  It was accompanied by pork chops cooked in a sauce in the crockpot.  Also smothered okra from the garden.  For those who don’t know.  Smothered okra is ground meat, onions (etc.) and cooked okra. One of Roy’s mother’s recipe that he loves!

I chose four of these potatoes to be our seed potatoes for the next crop.  I’ve read about planting potatoes in sand and pine straw.  Once the seed potatoes sprout we’ll be trying out that option of potato growing down in the sandy soil by the pond.  I’ve been raking up pine straw by the pond getting ready for that next experiment with growing potatoes.

These are the chopped okra that I made the smothered okra with.  This was two days’ worth of picked okra.  Okra growing is neat because every two to three days each okra plant has an okra pod ready to pick.  Once you see them start, within four days they are ready to pick!

This is the mashed potato made with potatoes from the garden. The okra in the smothered okra came from the garden.

The whole garden has gone through a thinning out process.  Removing the small, crowding plants to make room for expansion of the healthier remaining plants.  This is what it looks like now.

The 20 original tomato bushes have grown tall with many branches.  They all had to be tied up which makes the plants look scrawny which in a way they are.  These have been the scrawniest, lots of branches and tallest tomato plants ever. They have produced a tremendous amount of cherry tomatoes and a reasonable amount of large tomatoes.  Once Roy added lime to the soil the “blossom rot” stopped.  For a while, I picked the larger tomatoes when they first started turning so the “blossom rot” wouldn’t take hold.  Now I don’t have to pick until they are completely ripe without any “blossom rot”!!!   It looks like the tomato bushes are stopping their production and when they do that we will pull them up.  We will then refresh the nutrients in those two rows and plant cauliflower, broccoli and Brussel sprouts that we are now growing from seed. You may remember we tried to grow broccoli and cauliflower this spring and it got so infested with bugs that we pulled them up.  We are hopeful that this fall crop will be different.  We will be checking them very often to make sure that doesn’t happen.  They will also be planted farther apart which we hope helps! We have Brussels sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower seeds planted in individual cups and under the grow lights right now.  It will take them around a month to get ready for transplanting outside which should work well with when the tomatoes plants look like they will be ready to come out. When I checked these today several of the brussels sprouts and broccoli have sprouted!

All of the potatoes were dug up and we’ll plant the next potato crop down by the pond so the first row in the garden was open!  Instead of growing tomatoes from seed, this time we purchased 7 small Creole Tomato bushes and Roy proceeded to get them planted for our Fall tomato crop. For the spring crop next year, we purchased Creole Tomato seeds and will get those seeds planted early in 2020.

Our cantaloupe vine has finally produced a cantaloupe.  It was about the size of a baseball a few days ago when the picture was taken.    

One of the changes in the garden is that all of the original corn stalks have produced all they were going to and the stalks began dying like they were supposed to.  I pulled them all up and a few days later planted few new Kandy Korn corn seeds we got from the Feed and Seed in Hammond.  They have all sprouted and some are almost a foot high already.  The seeds were not all planted at the same time which explains the difference in corn stalk height.

The bell pepper plants have been thinned out. Those plants not having any blooms or new bell peppers were pulled up giving more space for the remaining ones to expand.  Each remaining plant has multiple tiny to medium size bell peppers growing!  Six bell peppers were ready to be picked this morning!

These are all of the bell peppers that were blanched and have been frozen today to be stuffed later and enjoyed!. Yes, that is a red bell pepper in the pot.  After it was picked it turned red which is something they do sometimes!

The artichoke plant is still growing but no artichoke yet!

The okra plants are doing really well.  They were thinned out last week like the bell peppers and original tomatoe plants were.  The gardenhad gotten so congested that I couldn’t make it through each row to pick or maintain the vegetables.  Every 2 to 4 days an okra pod is ready to pick on each plant.

There are multiple pods forming at the top of each plant which means we’ll have okra ready to pick for quite a while.

This is an eggplant plant which is one of the plants very congested.  There were not any that should be pulled up but I was able to prune lots of lower leaves which helped.  The lavender flowers may be hard to see on all of the plants but they are all over the plants.  Those flowers are potential eggplants which means their second crop is in the making. One of the several actual eggplants on the bushes.

All of the sweet potato blooms were cut off and a lot of the vine cut back.  This was done in preparation for the vine to die down. The sweet potatoes are getting ready to be dug up.  The original vine was so thick and tall that it wasn’t allowing the sun to get to the other vegetables growing next to it.  After trimming this back I could see a couple of nice sweet potatoes showing through the soil!!!

This was our harvest this morning. Beautiful tomatoes, cucumbers, okra, bell pepper and some of our yellow onions.  The yellow onions were not as big as they could be but the sprouts out of the ground had fallen over which is supposed to mean they are ready.  They were not ready but they did have the yellow paper like skin on them before I cleaned them. Even though they are small I will chop them up to use in cooking soon!  There are several more yellow onions still planted.

Our fig trees are full of figs but they haven’t started turning brownish purple which means they are ripe.  One is turning a tiny bit and we are hoping for the rest to ripen soon.  A dear friend of ours let us go over to her house where her figs are plentiful and lots were ready to pick.  Thank you, Donna and Chuck, for sharing those little gems of deliciousness with us!

Thanks for following our efforts to grow some vegetables. We’re changing now to the Fall Crop time so this is an ongoing Chauvin Produce Company garden.

Oh, and we had Hurricane Barry come through here as I wrote this.  We are happy that it didn’t turn out to be much of a storm for us.  Other areas including New Orleans flooded.  Homes and vehicles were lost in other parts of Louisiana and in Mississippi but we’re fine. Thanks to those who checked on us!