06.04.20 Chauvin Produce Company 2020 – May Update

I truly had forgotten how much time and effort is needed to grow vegetables. And just when some are starting to ripen, the temperatures soar to the 90s which makes being out there really difficult.

The only fruit that has required anything has been our blueberries. Since those are necessary for my brain health plus I love them, picking them is a joy. Except for the pain in my back that picking them cause. Oh well!

Starting with the main garden. Each of the vegetables growing in the main garden is labeled below and above plants. Click on that picture and any of them to enlarge it.

Roy’s tomatoes on the right in the photo above are ripening and are delicious! However, only half of the tomatoes that ripen are good, without bad spots. The other half either have a worm in them which he has sprayed for but a few got through. The other problem is the blossom rot. Roy has just added some lime to the soil to help prevent that. The tomatoes below were picked in one day. We are having to pick them early in their ripening process so they avoid the bad spots. They are delicious also!

We have enjoyed a tomato and cucumber salad with our meal every day this week and love that!

My cucumbers are producing a couple of nice ones each day which are being added to the tomato and cucumber salad. These young cucumbers are nice and tender! I love seeing new baby cucumbers like in these pictures.

.The cucumbers at bottom of the vines have an odd shape since they hit the ground in their growth and curve around upward. Those growing further up on the vine have a perfect cucumber shape.  Either shape is delicious!

Green beans are closest to the bottom of the picture and cucumbers at the other end.

Green bean bushes on the left and cucumber vines on the right.

I haven’t grown green beans before. It was quite a surprise to me how quickly they produced and how many! The beans growing in the main garden produce the most. They produce enough every day to have a meal of them. I’ve fixed them with potatoes and bacon and also with bacon wrapped around the beans. The rest have been blanched and frozen for future meals.

The turnips are another surprise for me. They grow quickly and are delicious. I had too many planted together in a few spaces which crowded the size of the bottom. We are only growing them for the bottoms which is a good thing because the green part had a lot of bug holes thought I never could find a bug on them.  I just picked another batch of turnips today to cook.

 I planted more turnip seeds in two other locations and they are slowly starting to sprout but just barely. Our first turnip side dish was served in butter salt and pepper. It was delicious. I buy turnip bottoms from the grocery sometimes and these tasted so much better! Several of my Facebook friends shared their turnip cooking recipes so I think I’m set for more turnip growth.

Okra plants are strong and growing well. I’ve picked four so far. I took these photos late last week. When I went out there this morning to pick they were already much bigger.

The bell pepper plants have flowers and some have tiny tiny bell peppers growing on them. The plants in the upper right corner of the photo above are some of the bell pepper bushes.

Eggplants are in varying sizes and the biggest two have purple flowers which precede the tiny eggplants themselves. Nothing to harvest yet but the plant looks great!

My seven cherry tomato bushes are loaded with tomatoes and are starting to ripen a few at a time! Mine were planted a month after Roys so they are maturing later.

The garden down by the pond:

The green bean plants produce a few green beans each day though they appear to have been enjoyed by some animal from time to time.

Roy’s second set of 11 creole tomato bushes are doing extremely well. He picked the first one this week and we can see hundreds more

The “dog cage garden”

Several turnip seeds were added this week in the middle of this garden. They are already sprouting! Three of my cherry tomato plants were also added to this garden.  From the time they were taken out of their pots until now (being in the ground), they have at least quadrupled their size. They are not as big or as far along as their brothers and sisters in the main garden but where they are planted is an experiment to see how that area does for tomatoes.

The potatoes have several bushes growing which is really all you see until it’s time to dig up the potatoes that are underground!

The green bean plants down there are doing about the same as the ones in the garden down by the pond. They are producing, just not as much as the main garden.

Carrot seeds were planted early this month and the green leaves that come out of the ground are doing well. There are two rows of them. In the photo below the watermelons are at the top and the two rows of carrots are at the bottom.

The red meat watermelon vines are growing really well and have flowers on them which will eventually become watermelons. The yellow meat watermelon vines are not doing as well but they are growing and look healthy. Watermelons are something we didn’t do outstanding with last year so this new place to grow them is so far promising. In the photo below the watermelon, vines are on the right and the carrots are on the left.

Fruit trees

Pecan tree is growing well but no pecans yet, too young.

The two fig trees are loaded with green figs which will probably give us around a hundred figs.

The plum tree is pretty but not bearing fruit yet, too young.

Like I said at first, the blueberries are just going to town and I am enjoying them every day.  A lot of them were put in the freezer and I get to put them in my oatmeal or yogurt every day fresh from the garden! We are over half way into them all ripening. A few more days and they will all be gone.

It has been fascinating to see a bunch of little green one a branch one day and the next one of them has exploded into this beautiful deep blue plump ripe blueberry.   The in-between stages going from small green to ripe plumb blue is a bluish pink stage.The bluish pink stage will be the ripe ones the next day. Of the eight bushes, one does not have any berries on it and I am going to figure out why before next year’s crop!

I love enjoying fresh blueberries right off the vine in my breakfast yogurt or oatmeal!

https://rosalynandroy.files.wordpress.com/2020/05/20200525_105015.jpg Roy’s grape vines are growing. No grapes on those vines yet!

I think that’s about it for the month of May. Some observations want to note.

Each row is not full of that row’s vegetable.

The turnip seeds I planted at this end of that row came up very well and quickly. The ones I planted at the other end of the row aren’t hardly doing anything. Not sure why!

Even though this years rows are further apart than last yer it is still difficult to get down the aisles as the plants get bigger.

Most important is that we purchased most all of our seeds from the Seed Plant online company. Thiswas a change from previous years.

 

08.26.19 Chauvin Produce Company – In Transition to the Fall Garden

Gardening is difficult when the weather is as hot has it has been.  The high today was in the high 70s so right after church today I spent several hours crawling around and working in our main vegetable garden. Pulling weeds has been difficult because the garden was so full. All weeds and dead leaves are now gone!  They will come back though! 😦  Many of the vegetables really needed tying up higher to the tall stakes and that was done today. Dirt gets washed away exposing the roots as time goes on so each plant got a fresh mound of dirt over the roots.

A lot has changed since I wrote last and we are transitioning to the Fall garden now.

While I worked in the garden Roy spent the whole afternoon assembling a square picnic table for family and friend gatherings.

My husband doesn’t do anything half way.  He could have assembled the picnic table and bench and walked away.  But these concrete squares are to go under each corners legs so it doesn’t sink into the ground and get uneven.  I’m already planning how to make that area down by the pond into something pretty where we’ll like to visit! It’s pretty far from the house but has a beautiful view of the pond!

Now to the garden. One thing we’ve learned is that we are either really not good at growing watermelons or the locations we’ve planted them in is no good.  We’ve had at least a dozen watermelons start to grow on the vines.  All but three withered up and died.   Two of the three are little and round, about two week old watermelons.  One got fairly large before we discovered it had been either eaten into or somehow went bad.  We’ve both agreed this may not be something we grow again next year.  After cutting off the bad part of the fairly large one, it was quite delicious.  I think we’ll get about three bowls full of watermelon from that one. I’ll leave the vines growing just in case a miracle happens and we get another nice size one!

We are proud that we grow okra really well.  Every day I cut at least one nice size okra from each plant.  Now that new branches are growing from near the bottom and okra are growing from there we have maybe 3 okra pods to pick from each plant.  I’ve shared okra, frozen sliced okra, cooked smothered okra, pickled okra, and boiled okra.  Every way I’ve fixed them has turned out great. The top of the okra plants are now around 7 feet tall.  I have to bend them over a lot to reach the top to snip off the okra pods!  Two of the plants have grown all the okra they are going to grow so I’ve cut them down to just above where the new bottom branches are growing. My smothered okra recipe will be included in the next blog post.

These tall scrawney okra plants are great producers.  You can see the yellow flower at the top and a flower near the bottom on the same plant where the new crop have started.

This one small okra plant is a different variety I tried this year from seed.  It’s the only seed of that variety that actually turned into a plant. It took longer to start producing but about a month ago it started producing an okra pod each day. These are some of the lower branches that are now producing okra.A pot of smothered okra and a pot of fresh potatoes

Bell peppers are another vegetable we grow well.  I’ve stuffed dozens of bell peppers. I also chopped up a lot of bell peppers and froze them.   I don’t know if it is our soil or the type of bell pepper seeds we grew we’ve grown but they don’t seem to get as big as the ones in the grocery.  They are however very tender and quite delicious! They are still producing quite a few in what I call their second season. This is a vegetable we will grow again. My stuffed bell pepper recipe will be included in the next blog post.

All of the sweet potatoes have been dug up.  The first batch stayed in the house for two weeks and then the storage shed for two weeks after digging them up.  They are now ready to cook.  Their shape is not always like the ones in the grocery. However, I’ve watched several videos about growing sweet potatoes and have found that other people have funky shaped sweet potatoes in their home gardens just like mine are. The second batch lived inside for a couple of weeks and have just been placed in the storage shed for the next two weeks.  I’ll let ya’ll know how the first batch of sweet potatoes tastes when they are cooked.  We’ve agreed we won’t be growing sweet potatoes anymore.  A lot of work and a lot of space for not many results.

This is the first batch that are ready to cook.

The second batch that will be ready after spending a couple of weeks in the warmth of the storage shed.  Aren’t they the weirdest shape things!?Our cucumbers are still producing. We’ve picked around 60 decent sized cucumbers so far. About a dozen cucumbers were yellowish in color as they grew.  They were delicious even though the cucumbers were yellow-skinned.  I’ve planted seeds three times since this planting season started.  The vines are sometimes strong and sometimes weak.  I learned I’m not great at pickling the cucumbers.  They get very soft though they taste okay.  I’ve fixed them a couple of different ways.  It’s a lot of work for something that doesn’t turn out great.

Roy’s new creole tomato plants are all producing at least one, some more.  Can’t wait for one to get ripe and taste it!

The original two rows of tomatoes are down to one plant! That one plant has one tomato on it and when that ripens we’ll pull it up.

The two rows above where those tomatoes grew will be planted with the cauliflower, broccoli, and brussel sprout plants that are almost ready to go in the garden.

The corn seeds planted about a month ago are growing well and most all have corn on them.

+The mirliton vines have been difficult to grow.  They do not make millions until August but so far we have no militon vegetables on the vines.  While the vines right now look okay and strong, during their growth they’ve been weak and then strong and then weak looking.  We were really hoping this would go well since we both love stuffed mirlitons and have such fond memories of Roy’s mom growing them in their garden.

Our fig trees are really weird.  These are a few of the figs still on the tree.  They are all still green.  Sometimes one will ripen and something eats part of it right away.  Most of them haven’t gotten anywhere near ripe. They have received a good soaking every day so we don’t know if something is wrong or if they are just late producers! 

The yellow onion crop was pretty small and the onions themselves were small.  I planted 100 yellow onion sets (tiny onions) and this is about half of what it produced. The largest ones are about tennis ball size.

We’re using the green tops of the onions on our baked potatoes tonight!

Our eggplants have done well.  The first group produced nice sized eggplants.  The second group produced mostly small ones.  Once they got about baseball size they fell off the bush.  If I didn’t get them off the ground the same day they rotted quickly.  The smothered eggplant casseroles turned out very tasty.  My smothered eggplant recipe will be included in the next blog post.

I love mangos and want to try growing them.  I found a video showing how to do that and am trying it!  The picture below shows the bottom half of a 2 liter bottle. The two baggies contain two different mango seeds.  I’ve always thought the seed was what was inside the mango that had lots of hair on it.  Come to find out that the actual seed is inside of that hairy thing.  The video said to gently dig out the seed and wrap it in a wet towel, then put it inside a zip lock bag for ten days.  At the end of the ten days you remove the papertowel wrapped seed from the baggy.  It is suppose to have a nice root growing on it.  You then add rocks and dirt to the empty bottle and plant the seed in it.  As the plant grows you put it in a larger container about every year.  Who knows if this will go well but it is too easy not to try!

The photo below shows the seeds wrapped up and the bottle cut in half. Here is a link to the video that taught me how to do this. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AV_J1ihtia8

The artichoke plant has not produced an artichoke but is still living so we’ll see how that does! If it’s not dead, it still has potential!

We’ve had so much rain, that continues this week that the garden has often been overflowing with water.  The seedlings are ready to plant but I’m waiting until the flood is over!

The fall garden will include cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, tomatoes, bell pepper, eggplants and okra. We’ll get a break in our gardening once we have our first freeze here.  I don’t know which vegetables can withstand the freeze but we have very few hours each year where the temperature is below freezing.

Ya’ll have a Blessed week!

 

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07.14.19 Chauvin Produce Company – Things they are a changing

Things, they are a changing in the garden!

This week I harvested our entire crop of potatoes.  See the picture below. It was not the large basket full of potatoes I hoped for.  But it will provide us with maybe 4 meals of potatoes so that’s good. Once the plants above the ground died off you’re supposed to wait two to three weeks and then dig them up.  I did that and didn’t get the big crop of larger potatoes I wanted.  There is no peaking under the soil to see what’s going on so they all got dug up and that’s that! If anyone reading this knows I did something drastically wrong, please let me know!

I cooked all of the really small ones and made homemade mashed potatoes for dinner.  It was accompanied by pork chops cooked in a sauce in the crockpot.  Also smothered okra from the garden.  For those who don’t know.  Smothered okra is ground meat, onions (etc.) and cooked okra. One of Roy’s mother’s recipe that he loves!

I chose four of these potatoes to be our seed potatoes for the next crop.  I’ve read about planting potatoes in sand and pine straw.  Once the seed potatoes sprout we’ll be trying out that option of potato growing down in the sandy soil by the pond.  I’ve been raking up pine straw by the pond getting ready for that next experiment with growing potatoes.

These are the chopped okra that I made the smothered okra with.  This was two days’ worth of picked okra.  Okra growing is neat because every two to three days each okra plant has an okra pod ready to pick.  Once you see them start, within four days they are ready to pick!

This is the mashed potato made with potatoes from the garden. The okra in the smothered okra came from the garden.

The whole garden has gone through a thinning out process.  Removing the small, crowding plants to make room for expansion of the healthier remaining plants.  This is what it looks like now.

The 20 original tomato bushes have grown tall with many branches.  They all had to be tied up which makes the plants look scrawny which in a way they are.  These have been the scrawniest, lots of branches and tallest tomato plants ever. They have produced a tremendous amount of cherry tomatoes and a reasonable amount of large tomatoes.  Once Roy added lime to the soil the “blossom rot” stopped.  For a while, I picked the larger tomatoes when they first started turning so the “blossom rot” wouldn’t take hold.  Now I don’t have to pick until they are completely ripe without any “blossom rot”!!!   It looks like the tomato bushes are stopping their production and when they do that we will pull them up.  We will then refresh the nutrients in those two rows and plant cauliflower, broccoli and Brussel sprouts that we are now growing from seed. You may remember we tried to grow broccoli and cauliflower this spring and it got so infested with bugs that we pulled them up.  We are hopeful that this fall crop will be different.  We will be checking them very often to make sure that doesn’t happen.  They will also be planted farther apart which we hope helps! We have Brussels sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower seeds planted in individual cups and under the grow lights right now.  It will take them around a month to get ready for transplanting outside which should work well with when the tomatoes plants look like they will be ready to come out. When I checked these today several of the brussels sprouts and broccoli have sprouted!

All of the potatoes were dug up and we’ll plant the next potato crop down by the pond so the first row in the garden was open!  Instead of growing tomatoes from seed, this time we purchased 7 small Creole Tomato bushes and Roy proceeded to get them planted for our Fall tomato crop. For the spring crop next year, we purchased Creole Tomato seeds and will get those seeds planted early in 2020.

Our cantaloupe vine has finally produced a cantaloupe.  It was about the size of a baseball a few days ago when the picture was taken.    

One of the changes in the garden is that all of the original corn stalks have produced all they were going to and the stalks began dying like they were supposed to.  I pulled them all up and a few days later planted few new Kandy Korn corn seeds we got from the Feed and Seed in Hammond.  They have all sprouted and some are almost a foot high already.  The seeds were not all planted at the same time which explains the difference in corn stalk height.

The bell pepper plants have been thinned out. Those plants not having any blooms or new bell peppers were pulled up giving more space for the remaining ones to expand.  Each remaining plant has multiple tiny to medium size bell peppers growing!  Six bell peppers were ready to be picked this morning!

These are all of the bell peppers that were blanched and have been frozen today to be stuffed later and enjoyed!. Yes, that is a red bell pepper in the pot.  After it was picked it turned red which is something they do sometimes!

The artichoke plant is still growing but no artichoke yet!

The okra plants are doing really well.  They were thinned out last week like the bell peppers and original tomatoe plants were.  The gardenhad gotten so congested that I couldn’t make it through each row to pick or maintain the vegetables.  Every 2 to 4 days an okra pod is ready to pick on each plant.

There are multiple pods forming at the top of each plant which means we’ll have okra ready to pick for quite a while.

This is an eggplant plant which is one of the plants very congested.  There were not any that should be pulled up but I was able to prune lots of lower leaves which helped.  The lavender flowers may be hard to see on all of the plants but they are all over the plants.  Those flowers are potential eggplants which means their second crop is in the making. One of the several actual eggplants on the bushes.

All of the sweet potato blooms were cut off and a lot of the vine cut back.  This was done in preparation for the vine to die down. The sweet potatoes are getting ready to be dug up.  The original vine was so thick and tall that it wasn’t allowing the sun to get to the other vegetables growing next to it.  After trimming this back I could see a couple of nice sweet potatoes showing through the soil!!!

This was our harvest this morning. Beautiful tomatoes, cucumbers, okra, bell pepper and some of our yellow onions.  The yellow onions were not as big as they could be but the sprouts out of the ground had fallen over which is supposed to mean they are ready.  They were not ready but they did have the yellow paper like skin on them before I cleaned them. Even though they are small I will chop them up to use in cooking soon!  There are several more yellow onions still planted.

Our fig trees are full of figs but they haven’t started turning brownish purple which means they are ripe.  One is turning a tiny bit and we are hoping for the rest to ripen soon.  A dear friend of ours let us go over to her house where her figs are plentiful and lots were ready to pick.  Thank you, Donna and Chuck, for sharing those little gems of deliciousness with us!

Thanks for following our efforts to grow some vegetables. We’re changing now to the Fall Crop time so this is an ongoing Chauvin Produce Company garden.

Oh, and we had Hurricane Barry come through here as I wrote this.  We are happy that it didn’t turn out to be much of a storm for us.  Other areas including New Orleans flooded.  Homes and vehicles were lost in other parts of Louisiana and in Mississippi but we’re fine. Thanks to those who checked on us!

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06.27.19 Chauvin Produce Update – It is Harvest Time!

Read on to find out what this is about!

The vegetable plants are as big as they need to get and they re all producing.  We are now harvesting daily!

Instead of showing the garden itself, I’ll share some photos of the harvest and a couple of the garden! We’ve been dealing with hungry little insects and bugs and spraying and spraying the plants

Every morning I go out to the garden and harvest whatever is ready.  Maintaining the garden and picking the vegetables have turned out to be difficult because my back gets inflamed within a minute of starting to bend over.  The rows seemed to be well spaced before the vegetable bushes grew to full size.  Now we feel they are too close together which is something we’ll change in future gardens.

 

 

Our corn has produced 12 corn on the cobs. They are so delicious!!! As time has passed the quality of the corn has gotten better and better.

When each corn stalk produced one and sometimes two corn cobs they started naturally withering and dying.  We’ve pulled up around 10 stalks so far.  There are around 5 stalks remaining.  New corn seeds were planted where there is available space and the next crop of corn has sprouted.  The picture below looks pitiful but they are doing what they are supposed to.  I cut the top half off when they need to come up out of the ground so Roy knows which ones to pull up.

These are where there were originally beautiful potato bushes.

Now, most are gone which is what they are supposed to do.  The potatoes growing under the ground take what they need from the plants above ground until there is nothing left of the bush.  The almost nothing you see below means things are going right!  They need to be in the ground a while longer before they can be harvested.  

Cucumbers are being harvested every day and they are big cucumbers.

I pickled four jars full a couple of weeks ago. Once we started eating them we realized I shouldn’t have pickled these really big ones since their skin is tougher.  I’ll be pickling the cucumbers while they are smaller from now on.  

We’ve been enjoying garden fresh tomato and cucumber salads every day. The lettuce in this picture also came from the garden!  I think this is the part of our vegetable garden adventure we are enjoying the most! We grew these from seeds, isn’t that cool!

At least a dozen usable bell peppers have been picked.  A few nonusable bell peppers were picked, the bad spots cut out and then the remainder chopped up to use for seasoning in my cooking. Three nice eggplants were picked so far.  Several eggplants are hanging on their bushes getting bigger every day.

I stuffed 12 bell peppers with ground meat, rice, garlic, onions, bell pepper, etc.  They were frozen in groups of three. 

This is the pot of eggplant that is being smothered with ground meat and seasoning.  We were able to make two large casseroles of smothered eggplant.  One casserole we’ve already eaten and it was delicious! The other is in the freezer. It looks totally different when the eggplant is cooked and smothered down!

The number of tomatoes in the bowl below are being picked every day.  We’ve either popped them in our mouth to enjoy or put them in a salad.

We pick about the amount of okra shown below every day.  We’ve picked around 40 okras so far. They are all being chopped up and frozen.  When we get a big enough bag we will fix smothered okra.

Our bigger tomatoes are just now starting to turn red.  Some of the bigger tomatoes have developed “blossom rot” which comes from a deficiency of calcium in the soil.  Roy researched it and found that lime needed to be added to the soil so he bought a 40 pound bag and treated the soil of the tomatoes, bell peppers and eggplants since those last two can be affected by blossom rot.

The okra plant makes this beautiful flower as it is growing.  You can see behind the flower in the picture are several budding okras.

Our one and only artichoke plant is doing well.  No artichokes yet but it’s a neat plant to watch it grow! 

The first of our green onion crop has been harvested and chopped using it in our cooking.

Now for the fruit

Our eight blueberry bushes were moved this year so we didn’t anticipate much of a crop and that’s what we got.  We let Madisyn pick the three blueberries and she shared them with me!

Our watermelon vines have one watermelon that is growing every day.  First is a close up of the 4-inch watermelon and second is the vine the watermelon is growing on.

In the garden down by the pond the watermelon vine is finally growing and flowering.

The cantaloupe in that same area is blooming really.  I am hopeful there will be fruit growing on each within the next week.

The fig trees are growing really well and figs are all over the trees.

The garlic and yellow onions are still growing and aren’t ready yet to harvest.

Our militon vines are having an issue with yellowing and dying leaves.  While those yellowing leaves dry up and fall off, lots of new green growth is blooming all over the vines. We researched this whil the yellowing occured and learned that the new green leaves may start growing so we are happy to see that happen/ Militon plants don’t start blooming and producing until around August or September so we’ll see how they do then!

The sweet potatoes are still a big bunch of vines that haven’t shown any sign of being ready to go away so we can dig up the sweet potatoes.  If these sweet potatoes do well and we decide to do it again we will NOT plant it in the middle of a garden.  The vines are so long and even though we let them go up and down a fine, they still take over a lot of area in the garden.  The big bunch of leaves on the right are the sweet potato vines.

Different types of inspects and bugs have attacked the plants in different ways. We’ve purchased three different types of insect sprays to wipe out these bugs that love the plants.  With the vegetable plants close together it is difficult to spray the whole plant. Lots of lessons are being learned so that’s good!

After I finished writing this yesterday I was in the garden and found 3 eggplants on the ground that had fallen off the bushes and had a bad spot on them.  Between that and the spots on a few bell peppers recently I decided to pick all the eggplants and bell peppers that were almost the right size to pick to avoid the possibility of a bad spot on them.  This morning I did that and here’s what I picked.  This mornings harvest included picking some smaller cucumbers that are better suited for pickling than the larger ones were. It only takes a couple of days for these cucumbers to grow from the small size to the large!

That’s it for now on our Spring 2019 gardening adventure!

 

06.05.19 Chauvin Produce Company Update

This produce update we’re starting with the bad news and then will go on to all of the good news.

Well, it was just not time for us to grow broccoli and cauliflower.  The plants got big, but bugs got the leaves.  We treated them all three different times using Sevin Dust, then Insecticidal Soap and then some stronger solution. After pulling them all up and putting them in a big bag the contents of the bag were sprayed and the dirt where they were planted was sprayed really well. The picture doesn’t in any way show how eaten up and almost leafless a lot of the broccoli and cauliflower were.

The healthy bushes to the right of the eaten up plants are our sweet potato plants.

Here’s a picture from the internet which much better shows what the broccoli and cauliflower plants look like.

The row is now empty after digging up the plants!  I’m not sure exactly what we’ll plant in their place or if we will plant anything.  I’ve been researching what to do about the soil I pulled the diseased plants out of.   As always, we’ll see!

Now on to all of the good garden news! The vines are doing well and producing really large cucumbers.

These cucumbers were picked this week.  We’ve eaten two and they were delicious!  I have saved some of these cucumber’s seeds for our next crop!

Tomato bushes – ours are really tall and thin but they are loaded with tomatoes!

 Big tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes

Bell Peppers plants and baby Bell Peppers

Okra plants and baby okra

Fig Trees

Peanuts, finally are growing down by the pond!

Watermelon vine finally growing down by the pond

Watermelon vines in a pot between the middle two blueberry bushes They are doing really well!

Cantaloupe growing well also with several blossoms

Blueberry bushes – still only three blueberries total!! 

Garlic and Yellow Onions – these won’t be ready for a while, it’s what they do! 

Cornstalks all have one ear of corn and some have two

Sweet potatoes are now growing up a little fence that isn’t really showing up in the picture.  It will be a while before these are ready

We have two lettuce plants.  Both are doing well!  They had a hard time at first but they look great now!  Eggplant plants, with flowers and with a baby eggplant.  Potatoes, the five bushes to the right of these are dead and gone, not a bad thing, that’s what they do.  This means it is two to three weeks until we can dig up those potatoes.  These were planted later than those. ArtichokeOur first corn harvest.  We may have picked them too soon because the cob was not full of kernels.  We ate these three corns this evening though and they were delicious!  Our first corn with not many kernels and the kernels we have are small!

We went to the grocery just now and saw that we could buy corn in the husks for 25 cents each!

Then Roy brought me over to see the already husked corn and said: “See honey this is what corn is suppose to look like!”  Good thing I love that man!

The whole main garden

The heat these last two weeks is not good at all for the vegetable gardens.  We water every evening, a really saturated kind of watering.  I’m hoping we can put up some kind of shade covering for the afternoon extreme sun.

Today it stormed and when looking at the weather the next week it will rain every day so that takes care of the heat problem for a while!

Ya’ll come back and have a Blessed Week!

 

05.07.19 Chauvin family is expecting a new baby!

Our tallest stalk of corn is expecting its first baby corn!!!  It’s not time for a full vegetable garden update but this new development is too wonderful to wait!

This is the stalk that was started from seed inside and was the only one that lived long enough to be planted outside!  The rest of the stalks were seeds planted directly outside so they are a bit behind that one.

Roy and I are very proud grandparents and cannot wait for the arrival of our newest grand baby, even if it is a corn!

The proud mama corn stalk

Baby Corn, due date unknown!

Ya’ll have a Blessed Week!

Image result for graphic scripture

 

05.04.19 Our One Year Anniversary!

One year ago today we began moving into the home we built three years before.  We rented it out for three years and this time last year we were moving the few things we had into our home. Since our motorhome was furnished with built in furniture there was only one small table to move into the house! Personal items and kitchen utensils made up the rest of what we had to move!

We’ve come a long way this year! We have a furnished living room.  An almost furnished bedroom (just missing the Grand Canyon canvas art) and cream colored short shag area rug for under the bed.  The other two bedrooms are as furnished as we need them to be for now.  We’ve moved around a lot of the flowers, blueberries and other bushes from where Dora use to live to around the house. We’ve established our main vegetable garden and that’s going really well!

More of the canvas prints from special places we traveled to and bunk beds in my rock room for grandchildren vists are planned for the future. We’d love to have a nice big deck outside the back door. More grass growing down the side hill would be nice.

Roy and I don’t need much to be happy and I can say we are very happy here! Occasionally I’ll miss the adventure of traveling and seeing our beautiful country. But when I sit outside and watch the hummingbirds play, and all the other birds and squirrels play around outside, hear the birds chirp and sing all day long, watch the cows with their baby cows following them, pick the wonderful blackberries down the road, sit by the pond to enjoy the fish, and feel the breeze there I realize we have it pretty good here.

All that doesn’t include our wonderful small home that is just perfect for us. I have a room dedicated to my rock painting and Roy has his computer, tinkering, building, fixing room! Three bedrooms in all and two full baths.  We love showing our place to friends and family so if you haven’t visited yet please do! Leave a comment below and we’ll set up a visit. I may even bake a cake and have some hot coffee for our visit!

God has taken care of us as a couple in so many ways and we are both thankful to be where we are at this time in our lives. Yes, we are old, I have dementia and both have health issues but we are blessed in so many ways and are happy we made the decision to move out of Dora and into our little home!

Ya’ll have a Blessed Weekend!

 

05.02.19 The Lesson of the Burnt Biscuits

If you’re anything like me, the family dinner table played a huge part in your childhood and to our own family dinner time with our sons..

Whether we were just sharing funny or heartwarming stories about the day’s activities or playing with the family dog dinner was an extra special time to enjoy each other’s company. Gosh, I miss those times with our two sons around the dinner table.

And when I saw how this father taught his children an extremely valuable lesson over their dinner meal, I had to pass it along.

This touching story has been passed around the internet for years, with its initial writer still unknown. The story follows one family and the way they handle a tired mother’s batch of burned biscuits.

We all know how hard moms work, and the story below speaks to a larger lesson of compassion that folks of all ages can get behind. And while these aren’t my words, they are words that deeply resonate with me.

This heartwarming story has been inspiring people around the world for years:

When I was a kid, my Mom liked to make breakfast food for dinner every now and then. I remember one night in particular when she had made breakfast after a long, hard day at work.

On that evening so long ago, my Mom placed a plate of eggs, sausage and extremely burned biscuits in front of my dad. I remember waiting to see if anyone noticed!”

All my dad did was reach for his biscuit, smile at my Mom and ask me how my day was at school.

I don’t remember what I told him that night, but I do remember watching him smear butter and jelly on that ugly burned biscuit…

He ate every bite of that thing — never made a face nor uttered a word about it!

When I got up from the table that evening, I remember hearing my Mom apologize to my dad for burning the biscuits.

And I’ll never forget what he said, “Honey, I love burned biscuits every now and then.”

Later that night, I went to kiss Daddy good night and I asked him if he really liked his biscuits burned.

He wrapped me in his arms and said, “Your Mom put in a hard day at work today and she’s really tired. And besides — a little burned biscuit never hurt anyone!’”

As I’ve grown older, I’ve thought about that many times. Life is full of imperfect things and imperfect people.

I’m not the best at hardly anything, and I forget birthdays and anniversaries just like everyone else.

But what I’ve learned over the years is that learning to accept each other’s faults, and choosing to celebrate each other’s differences, is one of the most important keys to creating a healthy, growing, and lasting relationship.

And that’s my prayer for you today… That you will learn to take the good, the bad, and the ugly parts of your life and lay them at the feet of God.

Because in the end, He’s the only One who will be able to give you a relationship where a burnt biscuit isn’t a deal breaker!

We could extend this to any relationship. In fact, understanding is the base of any relationship, be it a husband-wife or parent-child or friendship!

As the saying goes, ‘Don’t put the key to your happiness in someone else’s pocket — keep it in your own.’”

So, please pass me a biscuit, and yes, the burned one will do just fine.

Be kinder than necessary because everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.

Life without God is like an unsharpened pencil: it has no point.

Anonymous

Ya’ll have a Blessed Weekend – Yes It Is Almost Here!!

05.03.19 My sister came to visit and Chauvin Produce Company Update!

 

My sister Harriet and brother-in-law George came to visit on Monday!  There are few people I feel very comfortable talking with and my sister and brother-in-law are two of them.  Their visits are moments I cherish. We had a great time visiting and laughing over lots of silly things! Roy and I are planning a “Family Reunion” at our house in late May with Harriett’s children and grandchildren and ours.  We haven’t done this in a few years and several family members have been added in that time.  Can’t wait to get together with all of Grannie Jo’s children and grandchildren and great grandchildren and one great great grandchild on the way!  Our house is small but we have lots of outside space for playing and visiting!

Now on to our garden update!

We’ve learned that some crops do better when the seeds are planted directly in the garden instead of when the seeds are planted inside, sprouted and replanted in the garden.  They are corn, okra, cucumbers, watermelon, and cantaloupes.

The peanuts planted down by the pond are not growing at all. I planted more peanuts this week.

The tops of the Brussels sprouts plants down there were chewed off a couple of weeks ago and the remaining stalk of the plants are gone now.

I planted carrot seeds this week where the Brussels sprouts were.

A week or so ago the watermelon vines started growing really well.  A few days later the vines were almost all gone.  Again some critter struck and there went the watermelons. For now, we’re putting pots over what’s left of the watermelon and cantaloupe plants at night to protect them from being eaten.  So every evening we will be going down the hill to cover the watermelon and cantaloupe plants and in the morning we will be going down to take the pots off them.

The yellow onions are doing very well but they don’t look like much since the yellow onion is growing under the soil.   The buckets are over the last of the watermelon and cantaloupe vines that have survived whatever animal is chewing on the vines. The little bunches of rocks are where the vines were before getting eaten. Looks like a little graveyard! Nothing like putting the most pitiful picture first!

We had several watermelon seeds left so we planted them in a pot with good soil. When they all sprout we will move them to a large area behind the blueberry bushes since the critters don’t seem to come up the hill. One little watermelon seed sprouted so far! .

All that is what’s going on in the garden down by the pond.

It’s a very different story in our main garden.  Everything growing in the main garden is doing well and all seem to be happy little plants. The pine straw I added down each row is helping so much.  We’re only watering every other day now instead of every day like we did before adding the mulch.

Here are photos with some descriptions of how that vegetable is doing! You can see how far they’ve come from seeds. They are right now about the size they would be when we previously bought plants from the store.

REGULAR TOMATOES AND CHERRY TOMATOES
Since they were planted from seed, they are now about the size I would have purchased plants in the past.

SWEET POTATO VINES
The vines are spaced far apart because the vines grow really long. ROWS OF OKRA, CAULIFLOWER, ARTICHOKE, SWEET POTATOES, BELL PEPPERS

GARLIC AND YELLOW ONION
The garlic and the yellow onion pretty much look the same above the ground!BELL PEPPERS AND CORNSTALKS in the center in the first photo below

CORN STALKS

The tallest corn-stalk is the only one that was grown inside the house from seed.  All the others started inside died.  The rest of the corn stalks were planted directly in the garden from seeds.

BELL PEPPERS
They are all doing well.  A few looked like some bug got on them so they were treated with Sevin dust.

One ARTICHOKE PLANT
Never tried this before, I am happy with how it’s doing.CAULIFLOWER
It is really too early to plant Cauliflower and Broccoli so I am pleased they are growing well.  There’s only 4 Cauliflower plants and 3 Broccoli plants so they are all on the same row.

BROCCOLI OKRA
All of these tiny okra plants are growing from seeds planted directly in the garden a couple of weeks ago. None of the ones I grew inside lived 😦 EGGPLANTS
Nine plants, three in three rows growing well. CUCUMBER VINES
I have planted several seeds and only 5 have done well.  I just planted several more and they are sprouting, yay!! MILITON VINES
This is one vegetable I am really happy about.  Roy’s mom always grew militons and I kind of feel like we’re carrying on a family tradition.  We have four vines growing well in the garden and two militons inside that we’re hoping sprout soon.

REGULAR POTATO PLANTS

GRAPE VINES
These are over where Dora use to live but they are part of our growing experiments! Roy dug the grape vines up a few months ago and planted them into the top of a bucket with the bottom cut out.  He was trying to get them into a taller amount of good soil. So far so good!

That’s it for the garden update! I found a program called Grammarly that is helping me with my writing.  It doesn’t catch everything which was obvious when my last post included the word “bring” two times when I meant “brain”.  Roy catches these things for me and I appreciate that so much.

Ya’ll have a Blessed Week!